Election Q&A: Texas House District 134

Editor's note: The print edition voter guide listings incorrectly identified the party affiliation of the candidates. The correct affiliation is listed below.





HOUSTON



Texas House District 134










Sarah Davis*



R



Occupation: Attorney


Experience: Served as the State Representative for House District 134 since 2010. Led the House Appropriations Subcommittee that deals with our state healthcare system, including Medicaid, the Department of Family and Protective Services, and our state’s mental health hospitals. Served on the 10-person Budget Conference Committee that ultimately reconciles the differences between the House and Senate to produce a final 2-year budget for the state of Texas.






What would be your top priorities if you are elected?



SD: As a breast cancer survivor, the issue of healthcare is personal to me. Far too many Texans still lack the ability to see a doctor when they need one. That’s why I support expanding Medicaid eligibility in Texas and believe that all Texans should have the ability to access quality, affordable medical care. We also need to be focused on doing what we can to ease the burden this pandemic has created on people’s lives and livelihoods. Next session I plan on working to eliminate the kind of unnecessary government regulations that harm our small businesses so we can create jobs and get Texans back to work.



How will you work to build productive relationships across districts and party lines?



SD: I’m proud of my strong record of working with both parties to produce reasonable and responsible results for all Texans. I have the most independent voting record in Austin, and I’ve shown I’m not afraid to work with members of the other party when I think they’re right or stand up to members of my own party when I think they’re wrong. Whether it’s fighting for access to healthcare for needy families, protecting victims of human trafficking, or investing in flood relief in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, I have always worked across party lines to get results and I will continue to do so in the future.









Ann Johnson



D



Occupation: Attorney


Experience: Former chief human trafficking prosecutor, current teacher and small business owner who works in our criminal justice system as an attorney for many who cannot afford a lawyer. I am also a cancer survivor who was denied coverage for my pre-existing condition and had no choice other than to pay for an outrageously expensive policy.






What would be your top priorities if you are elected?



AJ: I will stand up to Republican attempts to deny coverage to Texans with pre-existing conditions, including COVID, and will expand access to health care for more than one million uninsured Texans. Federal funds are available but Republicans in Austin, driven by partisan politics, have refused to accept them. My opponent actually made the motion to kill the legislation in 2017. I will fight to protect public education, raise teacher pay so we can compete for the best teachers, and get more resources to modernize classrooms and reduce class sizes. I will also fight to end our senseless epidemic of gun violence.



How will you work to build productive relationships across districts and party lines?



AJ: I have shown my ability to work across the aisle. When I took the case of a 13-year-old charged with prostitution to the Texas Supreme Court, I was successful in convincing an all conservative court to rule in our favor and create a framework for protecting child victims of exploitation and human trafficking. I believe in working across the aisle to form policies that are good for our communities. Sadly, my opponent has taken a partisan turn to the right. She recently signed onto a partisan fight by Republicans that has stalled more than $1 billion in Hurricane Harvey housing recovery funds for the City of Houston.


By Matt Dulin
Matt joined Community Impact Newspaper in January 2018 and is the City Editor for Houston's Inner Loop editions.


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