SURVEY: League City residents satisfied with service, desire additional library

The results of a League City citizen survey—the second in as many years—shows residents are satisfied with the quality of life and city services offered in League City. (Jake Magee/Community Impact Newspaper)
The results of a League City citizen survey—the second in as many years—shows residents are satisfied with the quality of life and city services offered in League City. (Jake Magee/Community Impact Newspaper)

The results of a League City citizen survey—the second in as many years—shows residents are satisfied with the quality of life and city services offered in League City. (Jake Magee/Community Impact Newspaper)

The results of a 2021 League City citizen survey—the second since 2019—shows residents are satisfied with the quality of life and city services offered in League City.

Additionally, a new question on the survey shows overwhelming support for an additional library.

The survey, which was sent out last fall to a random sample of residents, asked respondents several questions about everything from public safety to roads to drainage. Dawn Davis, project manager for ETC Institute, the entity that conducted the survey, unveiled some highlights during League City’s workshop Feb. 22.

“Bottom line: Residents have a very positive perception of the city,” she said.

About 90% of respondents said they were satisfied with quality of life in League City. That is 8% above the U.S. average and 24% above the state average, Davis said.


Top concerns for respondents include fixing traffic and congestion, and maintaining streets and sidewalks. This is no surprise to the city, said Sarah Greer Osborne, director of communications and media relations; the 2019 survey showed residents overwhelmingly wanted traffic congestion addressed.

Respondents rated quality of life, reputation and appearance as the things about the city with which they are most satisfied. Police, fire and parks were the city services respondents were most satisfied with, Davis said.

Compared to the 2019 survey, there were notable increases in how quickly the city responds to requests, how easy it is to contact staff and how well city employees handle issues.

“Anytime you use customer service numbers going up, that’s a positive,” said John Bowen, League City city council member.

However, there were decreases in other areas such as the amount of youth athletic programs and quality of library programs, Davis said.

City Manager John Baumgartner contributed at least some of that to the COVID-19 pandemic. For instance, the city could not offer as many programs at the library at the height of the pandemic, he said.

“During this two-year period, COVID[-19] had an impact,” Baumgartner said.

Respondents were asked if they would prefer a multi-branch library system in League City or one central location. About two-thirds of respondents said they prefer a central location.

Additionally, respondents were asked if they would support building a combination library and recreation center on the city’s west side, and 62% said they would.

A couple years ago, city officials considered upgrading Helen Hall Library or building a new library, but discussions were postponed after voters approved May 2019 bond program, which included spending millions on drainage and traffic projects.

Overall, 77% of respondents said they felt they were getting their money’s worth for their tax dollars, Davis said.

Council Member Hank Dugie said the positive survey results are proof Baumgartner has created a good environment. Mayor Pat Hallisey agreed.

“Certainly, it’s a team effort,” Baumgartner said.
By Jake Magee

Editor, Bay Area & Pearland/Friendswood

Jake has been a print journalist for several years, covering numerous beats including city government, education, business and more. Starting off at a daily newspaper in southern Wisconsin, Magee covered two small cities before being promoted to covering city government in the heart of newspaper's coverage area. He moved to Houston in mid-2018 to be the editor for and launch the Bay Area edition of Community Impact Newspaper. Today, he covers everything from aerospace to transportation to flood mitigation.