NEW: Crystal Lagoon now open to public through Sept. 27

Crystal Lagoon opened for resident use in early June, and public access is available July 15 through Sept. 27. (Courtesy of Lago Mar)
Crystal Lagoon opened for resident use in early June, and public access is available July 15 through Sept. 27. (Courtesy of Lago Mar)

Crystal Lagoon opened for resident use in early June, and public access is available July 15 through Sept. 27. (Courtesy of Lago Mar)

Updated Sept. 14 at 7:53 p.m.

Due to strong demand, Summer Lagoonfest is continuing 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursdays through Sundays until Sept. 27, according to a media release.

Tickets for the extended days are on sale now and start at $10 for children under age 13 and $15 for those 13 and older, per the release.

“We originally planned on ending Summer Lagoonfest Sept. 13,” Uri Man, the executive vice president of Lago Mar’s developer Land Tejas, said in the release. “But the response has been so terrific with more than 70,000 people enjoying the lagoon since opening and the Houston weather suitable for sunny days at the beach into the fall, that we decided to extend the days.

Tickets typically sell out a week in advance, so purchasing them ahead of time is still recommended, Man said in the release.



Originally posted 2:32 p.m. July 15

Crystal Lagoon is open to the public Wednesdays through Sundays starting July 15 through Sept. 13, according to a July 13 media release.

While the lagoon was initially reserved for residents of the Lago Mar community, the Texas City amenity’s blue waters and white sand beaches will now be open to all after increasing demand. An inflatable obstacle course, kayaks, sailboats, stand-up paddleboards, food trucks and more will also be available for day-pass visitors.

Only a limited number of tickets are available each day, and stringent cleaning practices will be in place, according to the release. The 12-acre lagoon, located at 3240 Lago Mar Blvd. in Texas City, will be open 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.


Uri Man, the executive vice president of Lago Mar’s developer Land Tejas, said in the release the lagoon’s size, combined with its operating at under 50% capacity, makes it an ideal place to enjoy the summer while practicing social distancing. There has been “immense demand” for public access since the lagoon opened in early June, prompting officials to fast-track the opening of a section for ticketed use, Man said.

“We are making paradise accessible to Houstonians by opening our family-friendly beach life experience to the general public for a limited time,” Man said in the release.

Guests are advised to purchase tickets in advance to ensure access. While ticket prices are subject to change, Summer Lagoonfest tickets start at $10 for children under age 13 and $15 for those age 13 and older. Children age 2 and under get in for free. Tickets purchased at the box office on the day of entry will be sold at the highest price levels, per the release.

The lagoon will operate at reduced capacity to allow for adequate social distancing, and face masks are required for entry as well as in designated common areas. Staff will also wear masks and undergo daily health screenings. Beach and lawn furniture will be cleaned regularly, and all restrooms and other high-traffic areas will be sanitized frequently.

Future phases of development around the lagoon are planned to include hotels, condo buildings, retail, dining and entertainment, as well as a separate pay-for-access beach club, per the release.

Public access will eventually include multiple beaches; a cabana pool; a two-story, swim-up bar on an island; a kid’s beach with water features; a floating obstacle course; and a water sports facility with kayaks, paddleboards and small sailboats, per the release. There is also an event center planned with a beachfront event lawn for corporate events, weddings and concerts.

By Colleen Ferguson
A native central New Yorker, Colleen Ferguson worked as an editorial intern with the Cy-Fair and Lake Houston | Humble | Kingwood editions of Community Impact before joining the Bay Area team in 2020. Colleen graduated from Syracuse University in 2019, where she worked for the campus's independent student newspaper The Daily Orange, with a degree in Newspaper and Online Journalism from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications and a degree in Spanish language and culture. Colleen previously interned with The Journal News/lohud, where she covered the commute in the greater New York City area.

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