Final voting results from McKinney voters in March 2018 primary elections

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Updated March 7 at 1:05 a.m.

Here are the final results from the contested Republican and Democratic March 6 primaries for races affecting McKinney residents.

Some races resulted in a runoff election because no candidate received more than 50 percent of the vote in the respective race.

More information about the candidates can be found through our interactive election guide here.

Collin County Judge

Republican
Chris Hill: 60.84%
Scott Johnson: 31.28%
Ray Ricchi: 7.87%

Collin County Commissioner Precinct 3

Republican
Dr. Briana Andor: 43.97%
Darrell Hale: 56.03%

Justice, Collin County Fifth Court of Appeals, Place 11

Republican
John Browning: 57.08%

Tom Nowak: 28.44%
Dan Wyde: 14.49%

Correction: A previous version of this story reported only results from Collin County for this race. The correct percentages have been added.

Justice, Collin County Fifth Court of Appeals, Place 12

Republican
Perry Cockerelle: 19.05%
William “Randy” Johnson: 39.54% *
Jim Pikl: 41.41% *

* William “Randy” Johnson and Jim Pikl will advance to a primary runoff.

Correction: A previous version of this story reported only results from Collin County for this race and incorrectly reported Jim Pikl won the primary outright. The story has been corrected to reflect that Jim Pikl and William “Randy” Johnson will head to a May 22 runoff.

Collin County 219th District Court judge

Republican
Scott Becker: 25.31%
Glenn Brenner: 7.68%
Mike Curran: 16.19%
Jennifer Edgeworth: 50.82%

Collin County District Attorney

Republican
Casey Davis: 21.36%
Greg Willis: 78.64%

U.S. Representative, District 3

Republican
Alex Donkervoet: 5.93%
David Niederkorn: 9.41%
Van Taylor: 84.66%

Democrat
Adam P. Bell: 17.95%
Lorie Burch: 49.61%
Sam Johnson: 28.68%
Medrick Yhap: 3.76%
Burch and Johnson will advance to a primary runoff election. 

State Senator, District 8 (Collin and Dallas counties)

Republican
Phillip Huffines: 45.61%
Angela Paxton: 54.39%

Democrat
Brian Chaput: 49.1%
Mark Phariss: 50.9%

School Board of Education, District 12 (Collin and Dallas counties)

Democrat
Tina Green: 25.6%
Laura Malone-Miller: 26.33%
Suzanne Smith: 48.07%
Malone-Miller and Smith will advance to a primary runoff election. 


Originally posted March 6 at 7:37 p.m.

Here are the early voting results from the contested Republican and Democratic March 6 primaries for races affecting McKinney residents. Final results will be posted later tonight once they have been released by the county election departments.

Follow Community Impact on Twitter, @impactnews_mck, and on Facebook for coverage throughout the night.

More information about the candidates can be found through our interactive election guide here.

Collin County Judge

Republican
Chris Hill: 62.64%
Scott Johnson: 29.83%
Ray Ricchi: 7.54%

Collin County Commissioner Precinct 3

Republican
Dr. Briana Andor: 45.15%
Darrell Hale: 54.85%

Collin County Fifth Court of Appeals justice, Place 11

Republican
John Browning: 55.78%
Tom Nowak: 32.55%
Dan Wyde: 11.67%

Collin County Fifth Court of Appeals justice, Place 12

Republican
Perry Cockerelle: 15.24%
William “Randy” Johnson: 27.93%
Jim Pikl: 56.83%

Collin County 219th District Court judge

Republican
Scott Becker: 25.27%
Glenn Brenner: 7.09%
Mike Curran: 15.44%
Jennifer Edgeworth: 52.19%

Collin County District Attorney

Republican
Casey Davis: 20.15%
Greg Willis: 79.85%

U.S. Representative, District 3

Republican
Alex Donkervoet: 5.73%
David Niederkorn: 8.15%
Van Taylor: 86.13%

Democrat
Adam P. Bell: 17.64%
Lorie Burch: 51.53%
Sam Johnson: 27.37%
Medrick Yhap: 3.46%

State Senator, District 8 (Collin and Denton counties)

Republican
Phillip Huffines: 46.26%
Angela Paxton: 53.74%

Democrat
Brian Chaput: 46.35%
Mark Phariss: 53.65%

School Board of Education, District 12 (Collin and Denton counties)

Democrat
Tina Green: 24.5%
Laura Malone-Miller: 25.19%
Suzanne Smith: 50.31%

All results are unofficial until canvassed. For more local primary election results and coverage, visit communityimpact.com/vote.

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  1. I noticed during this election cycle that Collin County commissioners stand alone in setting their own compensation and benefits, and that they are far and away the highest paid elected officials outside of the US Congress. I don’t think it is logical or appropriate to consider the 5 elected laypersons at county (commissioners and co. judge) in the same bundle as professional bench judges and law enforcement, such as sheriffs and constables. So, for example, politics can propel a house painter, chiropractor or interior decorator into county management as a commissioner with a $10,000 plus monthly compensation package and no obvious public administration skills, These officials are paying themselves nearly $1,000,000 tax dollars collectively every year and with no specific office hours or duties. That is inconsistent with other agencies and I wish some neutral party could explain why this is going on at the county.

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Cassidy Ritter
Cassidy graduated from the University of Kansas in 2016 with a degree in Journalism and a double minor in business and global studies. She has worked as a reporter and editor for publications in Kansas, Colorado and Australia. She was hired as senior reporter for Community Impact Newspaper's Plano edition in August 2016. Less than a year later, she took the role of editor for the McKinney edition.
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