Business aims to serve northeast Fort Worth locals, Honduran students with cups of caffeine

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When opening Axiom Coffee, Heath and Luke Miller said they designed the business to be a community “happy place.”

The brothers and co-owners of Axiom first laid the foundation for the business in 2014. Heath had worked for chain and independent coffee shops and wanted to build a concept that served more than coffee. His aim was to operate a business that also served its community, he said.

He teamed up with Luke, and the two began planning and saving for their venture. They started construction of Axiom in 2017 and officially opened the shop in November 2018.

Customers at Axiom can buy bags of coffee beans as well as hot and cold beverages, breakfast and lunch foods, and pastries and other snacks. In the future, the Millers plan to expand their offerings to include keto-friendly and gluten-free items.

Luke, who was previously in the construction business, built out Axiom’s interior. Of the shop’s 3,000 square feet, around 2,600 square feet is dedicated to seating. The brothers designed Axiom to have an upscale and open feel where community members can study or work for long periods of time without worrying about buying a drink or food.

Axiom’s space is also used for events hosted by local charities and organizations, such as Community Storehouse and Sunshine Spaces.

Long term, the brothers want to provide more open space with outdoor seating and a garden.

“We wanted a place where you could meet … and it’s a step up from a place that’s loud and quick and fast,” Luke said. “We wanted to create a venue that people love.”

In addition to serving northeast Fort Worth and surrounding communities, Heath and Luke are working through Axiom to serve poor students in Honduras. Around 80% of the shop’s coffee beans are sourced from Rancho Ebenezer, a charity in Honduras that harvests and sells the beans.

Axiom Coffee buys coffee beans from Rancho Ebenezer to help fund the organization’s yearly budget. With Axiom’s support, the charity does not have to worry about fulfilling yearly sales to fund their operations, Heath said.

Proceeds from Rancho Ebenezer’s coffee sales provide housing and education through the high school level for 40 poor students.

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4 comments
COMMENT
  1. COMMUNITY USER

    LUKE DIDNT BUILD AXIOM!…
    PEOPLE WHO LOVE THEIR CHURCH!!!!
    BUILT AXIOM!!!!

    I HEARD PEOPLE WORKED FOR FREE,
    BECAUSE THEY WORKED FOR THEPURPOSE!!!

    NOT LUKE TO JUST TAKE ADVANTAGE AND CALL IT HIS OWN.

    HEATH IS ABSOLUTELY FINE, HES GREAT…..

    Luke?
    He watches YouTube videos and lets everyone els do the work.

    PEOPLE WHO LOVE THEIR CHURCH WORKED HARD… FOR THE PURPOSE OF REACHING OUT TO THE COMMUNITY!

    FOR FREE…..

    FOR THE PURPOSE THAT AXIOM STANDS FOR.

  2. COMMUNITY USER

    LUKE WORKED, ALL THEM DID, JUST OVER COMMENTED…..sorry about the way it sounded. The email I used isn’t entering right…. delete my first comment, I can’t do it myself

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Korri Kezar
Korri Kezar graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2011 with a degree in journalism. She worked for Community Impact Newspaper's Round Rock-Pflugerville-Hutto edition for two years before moving to Dallas. Five years later, she returned to the company to launch Community Impact Newspaper's Keller-Roanoke-Northeast Fort Worth edition, where she covers local government, development, transportation and a variety of other topics. She has also worked at the San Antonio Express-News, Austin-American Statesman and Dallas Business Journal.
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