99.9% of Tarrant County counted as 2020 census set to end Oct. 15

About 1.5% of Texans remain uncounted in the 2020 census as of Sept. 29. (Chance Flowers/Community Impact Newspaper)
About 1.5% of Texans remain uncounted in the 2020 census as of Sept. 29. (Chance Flowers/Community Impact Newspaper)

About 1.5% of Texans remain uncounted in the 2020 census as of Sept. 29. (Chance Flowers/Community Impact Newspaper)

Months of on-the-ground efforts in Tarrant County for the 2020 Census show a 99.9% response rate, after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Oct. 13 to end data collection at 11:59 p.m. Oct. 15.

As of Oct. 12, 68.7% of Tarrant County has self-responded to the census—a 2% increase from the last census in 2010. The 99.9% rate includes the responses gathered by Census workers who reached out for answers from those who did not respond to the questionnaire online or by phone or by mail.

Nationwide and statewide numbers also show 99.9% of all residents have completed the 2020 census.

If you have yet to fill out the census, internet self-responses can be submitted at my2020census.gov. Residents can also fill out their census via phone by calling 844-330-2020. If you are submitting your census by mail, it must be postmarked by Oct. 15.

Responses for the census are taken every 10 years, as required by the U.S. Constitution, and must be completed by all residents of a county. Filling out the census helps to determine the allocation of billions of federal funds to local communities for schools, roads and other public services, as well determining the number of seats each state has in Congress and other levels of government.


The latest census numbers show Tarrant County's population is not only increasing but also getting older and more diverse: Almost 55% of the total population is considered a minority, and 11% are over the age of 65.

The announcement came after the U.S. Supreme Court approved the White House administration’s emergency request for the census to end earlier. Justice Sonia Sotomayor was the only one to dissent, saying “the harms caused by rushing this year’s census count are irreparable. And respondents will suffer their lasting impact for at least the next 10 years.”

In August, the court previously ruled the deadline for all responses was Oct. 31.
By Sandra Sadek
Sandra Sadek covers the cities of Grapevine, Southlake and Roanoke as well as Carroll ISD for Community Impact. She graduated from Texas State University where she majored in journalism and international relations. She has experience working for several local papers including the University Star, the Katy Times, and the Fort Stockton Pioneer. When she's not on the ground reporting, she enjoys a good book and a hot drink. Follow her on social media @ssadek19.