Grapevine’s ban on short-term rentals halted by lawsuit

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Editor’s Note: This article has been updated to include additional information.

Updated at 3:46 p.m., Oct. 31

The hearing over the requested temporary injunction has been reset to Nov. 6, according to a phone call received from the plaintiffs’ attorney J. Patrick Sutton.

Originally posted at 10:35 a.m., Oct.

A lawsuit was served to the city of Grapevine, challenging its ban on short-term rentals four days before the re-enforcement of the ban was set to take effect on Oct. 22, according to a city news release.

Grapevine has had an ordinance in place banning short-term rentals since 1982, but the council recently voted to reinforce the ordinance, which included sending known short-term rental owners cease and desist notices.

Local residents Linda Morrissey, Ludmilla Muns, Richard Mueller, Pamela Holt and Kari and Kevin Perkins filed the lawsuit in opposition of this ordinance, Grapevine City Attorney Matthew Boyle said in an email.

Judge Kimberly Fitzpatrick granted a restraining order to prevent the city from enforcing the ban until the issue is resolved.

Because a restraining order is only effective for 14 days after it is issued, the plaintiffs have requested a temporary injunction to prevent the city from enforcing its short-term rental ban after the restraining order expires. Judge Mike Wallach of the 348th Tarrant County District Court will consider their request during a hearing Nov. 1, Boyle said.

In the meantime, Mayor William D. Tate made a statement, adhering to the city’s original decision to prohibit short-term rentals.

“We will vigorously defend the longstanding prohibition against short-term rentals to protect Grapevine neighborhoods,” Tate said in the city news release. “People buy homes in neighborhoods, expecting to be surrounded by other residents and not money-making businesses that disrupt the peace, quiet and tranquility of our neighborhoods.”

Community Impact Newspaper will continue to update this story as more information becomes available.

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3 comments
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  1. William D, blowing hot air yet again. We’ll see what Property Owner’s rights have to say about that “city ordinance” — my land owners rights trump that of any city code in Texas. Always has, always will. Want rules? Move into an HOA community with fees.

  2. Richard A Craft

    “People buy homes in neighborhoods, expecting to be surrounded by other residents and not money-making businesses that disrupt the peace, quiet and tranquility of our neighborhoods.”

    …tell that that to the people who live within 2 miles of Main Street, The Gaylord, Great Wolf, The Mall, The Lake, The Golf Course.

    Who brought “money making”, and disruption to Grapevine?

  3. Linda Morrissey

    HI Renee
    I just read the latest article you wrote.
    It does represent the Mayor saying it was a longstanding Ordinance but fails to say a little known fact that that ordinance was created to reduce the numbers of homeless people that were camping out by Lake Grapevine in the 80’s.
    At that time STR’s did not exist.
    In order to enforce the said ordinance, they had to change the wording and the definitions and add the words STRs.

    So since the city accepted occupancy taxes from several Owners for 3 years, they obviously were unaware of any existing ordinance.

    Just FYI,
    Linda

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Renee Yan
Renee Yan graduated May 2017 from the University of Texas in Arlington with a degree in journalism, joining Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in July.
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