Roadway work in northwest Frisco to expand traffic lanes in 2021

Gilbert voters could be asked to allow the town to sell bonds that would transportation and infrastructure projects in the coming years. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Gilbert voters could be asked to allow the town to sell bonds that would transportation and infrastructure projects in the coming years. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Gilbert voters could be asked to allow the town to sell bonds that would transportation and infrastructure projects in the coming years. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

More major construction is coming to northwest Frisco.

The city of Frisco has been concentrating on this area in anticipation of the upcoming PGA of America headquarters and golf courses opening in 2022. In December the city wrapped up construction on several of these road projects, such as Legacy Drive from PGA Parkway to US 380 and Championship Drive from PGA Parkway to US 380. This comes out to about $35 million worth of infrastructure, Frisco Assistant Engineering Director Jason Brodigan said.

“This is a huge achievement for our engineering team,” Brodigan said. “It happened in less than two years. We’re pretty proud of that.”

This year the city will begin work on connecting Panther Creek Parkway to PGA Parkway, Brodigan said.

“Right now there’s no connection from Panther Creek to PGA on north/south Legacy; it stops at Panther Creek,” he said.

His department is starting on the design to extend Legacy north to PGA Parkway, Brodigan said. Construction is expected to begin in late 2021 or early 2022. The project is funded by the city and is expected to last 15-18 months.

Another project the city is moving forward with is the extension of Panther Creek from the Dallas North Tollway to Preston Road. It will create a section of road that doesn’t exist today, Brodigan said.

“That one is critical to serving the University of North Texas campus that’s coming to Frisco. We will get started on that and hopefully be ready for when they open,” he said.

This project is funded by the city of Frisco and will cost $37 million. Construction should begin in late 2021, Brodigan said.

US 380 expansion ongoing in Frisco

A project coming to the northwest corner of Frisco will widen US 380 to add capacity and provide safety enhancements.

US 380 will be expanded from four to six lanes through Frisco with grade separations at major intersections. Crews will also construct improved sidewalks from the US 377/US 380 intersection to west of County Road 26 in Frisco.

The existing four-lane roadway is insufficient for the current demand, a Dec. 2 Texas Department of Transportation presentation said. The portion of the project in Frisco is expected to be let for construction in the summer, officials said. It will widen the existing road with overpasses and a raised median, the TxDOT presentation said. The estimated cost for this portion of the project is $160 million, officials said.

Work is also being done on 380 to the west of Frisco to expand this section of the road to six lanes. This portion of the project will begin in January and will span from Loop 288 to west of US 377, officials said. Work will involve some expected lane closures to add the lanes, as well as sidewalks, turn lanes and a shared-use lane. The cost for this portion of the project is expected to be about $21 million, officials said.

Also worth following in 2021: Construction to widen Legacy Drive to begin in 2021

Design work to widen Legacy Drive from SH 121 to Warren Parkway is drawing to a close. The project will reconstruct existing lanes and add a third lane in each direction with a divider, bringing the roadway to six lanes total, per city documents.

“Legacy in that area was built in the mid- to late-80s,” Brodigan said. “It’s just reached its service life. Plus it has a lot of traffic that uses it.”

This project will include a new traffic signal at Country Club Drive and adjustments to existing signalized intersections, officials said.

Per the December Public Works report from the city, design work is 95% complete. Construction should begin in March or April and take 18 months, Brodigan said.

“That’s going to be a complex project,” he said.

By Miranda Jaimes

Editor, Frisco & McKinney

Miranda joined Community Impact Newspaper as an editor in August 2017 with the Grapevine/Colleyville/Southlake edition. In 2019 she transitioned to editor for the McKinney edition. She began covering Frisco as well in 2020. Miranda covers local government, transportation, business and nonprofits in these communities. Prior to CI, Miranda served as managing editor for The Prosper Press, The Anna-Melissa Tribune and The Van Alstyne Leader, and before that reported and did design for The Herald Democrat, a daily newspaper in Grayson County. She graduated with a degree in journalism from Oklahoma Christian University in 2014.