Frisco’s Baylor Scott & White hospitals receive Level II NICU designations

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Two Frisco hospitals—Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Frisco and Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Centennial—have received Level II designations for their neonatal intensive care units.

The hospitals received the designations after both applied for a Level III designation.

As of Monday afternoon, Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Centennial’s website said the hospital offers a Level III NICU.

A representative for Baylor Scott & White Health was not immediately available for comment.

Texas hospitals had until Sept. 1 to receive a NICU designation from the state in order to continue receiving Medicaid reimbursements. Legislation was passed in 2013 that established designations for NICUs.

Hospitals could apply for one of four levels of designation.

According to the state, Level IV, or advanced, NICUs provide care for mothers and their infants of all gestational ages with the most complex or critical illnesses. Level IV NICU infants may require life support.

Level III NICUs also care for infants of all gestational ages but treat illnesses anywhere from mild to critical.

Level II NICUs care for infants that are at or older than 32 weeks gestational age, and Level I NICUs care for infants that are at or older than 35 weeks gestational age.

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Lindsey Juarez
Lindsey has been involved in newspapers in some form since high school. She graduated magna cum laude from the University of Texas at Arlington in 2014 with a degree in Journalism. While attending UTA, she worked for The Shorthorn, the university's award-winning student newspaper. She was hired as Community Impact Newspaper's first Frisco reporter in 2014. Less than a year later, she took over as the editor of the Frisco edition. Since then, she has covered a variety of topics and issues important to the community, including the city's affordable housing shortage, the state's controversial A-F school accountability system and the city's "Bury the Lines" efforts.
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