Residents seek answers to North Texas Municipal Water District’s chlorine maintenance

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In response to recent concerns about water quality in North Texas Municipal Water District member cities, the district has put together a facts web page about chlorine maintenance.

The water district is nearing the end of its annual chlorine maintenance phase, which is intended to help optimize the quality of water and reduce hydrant flushing during warmer weather months. During maintenance, the district said the drinking water would remain safe but have a stronger chlorine taste or smell.

Concerns were raised last week after environmental activist Erin Brockovich questioned the district’s methods on Facebook.

The city of Frisco has also posted a page linking to the district’s facts page, the city’s latest water quality report and videos about the city’s water system.

During Tuesday’s Frisco City Council meeting, resident Brandon Burden addressed the council on behalf of Safer Water, North Texas, a Facebook group formed to question the district’s annual chlorine maintenance. Burden asked the council to consider addressing this issue at a council meeting by next month to answer residents’ questions about the maintenance process.

Frisco Mayor Jeff Cheney said he has heard a number of concerns from residents, and the city is working with the district to get as much information out as possible.

“Just speaking to our experts here, they say the water is safe,” he said. “We just want to make sure that everyone has all their questions answered. There is a lot of misinformation that is out there in the public.”

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Lindsey Juarez Monsivais
Lindsey has been involved in newspapers in some form since high school. She graduated magna cum laude from the University of Texas at Arlington in 2014 with a degree in Journalism. While attending UTA, she worked for The Shorthorn, the university's award-winning student newspaper. She was hired as Community Impact Newspaper's first Frisco reporter in 2014. Less than a year later, she took over as the editor of the Frisco edition. Since then, she has covered a variety of topics and issues important to the community, including the city's affordable housing shortage, the state's controversial A-F school accountability system and the city's "Bury the Lines" efforts.
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