Frisco ISD superintendent on what students, families can expect as schools reopen

Frisco ISD students who opted into in-person learning return to schools Sept. 3  (Community Impact staff)
Frisco ISD students who opted into in-person learning return to schools Sept. 3 (Community Impact staff)

Frisco ISD students who opted into in-person learning return to schools Sept. 3 (Community Impact staff)

After months of preparation, a portion of Frisco ISD students are soon returning to schools for face-to-face instruction in a revamped learning model, according to Superintendent Mike Waldrip.

“In-person learning is going to be different than it has been in the past given everything that we’re having to deal with,” Waldrip said. “But we’ve got a really good product in terms of how we’re able to deliver instruction.”

The first three weeks of the 2020-21 school year were completely virtual in FISD. Students who opted into in-person learning return to schools Sept. 3, and Virtual Academy students will continue online instruction.

“I just want our community to know we’ve worked really hard to put a learning model in place, both in person and virtually, that will continue to meet the learning needs of our students,” Waldrip said.

As the school year progresses, Waldrip said FISD is receiving daily and weekly guidance from the Texas Education Agency and local health officials.


“Things have changed almost on a daily basis throughout the course of the whole event since March,” he said.

A recent call with the TEA outlined an upcoming online reporting process of COVID-19 cases for all Texas school districts. FISD began sharing active cases of students and staff on its website Aug. 28.

As seen with school reopenings across the country, Waldrip said it is “inevitable” that FISD campuses will temporarily close due to positive COVID-19 cases and face-to-face students will briefly return to virtual learning.

FISD may close a campus for up to five days to complete close contact reviews and quarantine procedures, according to district protocol.

“We’re going to try to minimize as much as possible the length of time that we have to close a school or even a classroom,” Waldrip said. “It very much turns on the individual event as to what we’ll do.”

District leaders in curriculum, technology and safety protocols have worked “nonstop” over the summer for a safe return to campuses, Waldrip said.

“I think everybody that wants to come back is ready to come back, and teachers are anxious to get started,” he said. “I think it’s going to be a really good day on Sept. 3.”