Frisco Library passport processing increases 544% over last year

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More than 3,000 passport applications have been processed through the Frisco Public Library so far this year, a 544% increase over the same time last year, according to the library’s monthly statistical report. The library processed 510 applications at the same time last year.

Library Director Shelley Holley said the library has expanded the working hours of the library’s passport center as of Oct. 1 in order to address the increasing demand.

The expanded working hours allows two employees to process applications each day the center is open, which will allow more applicants to be seen, Holley said.

The change will also allow the library to process more walk-in applications, said Rachel Harris, assistant director of library operations.

Harris said the library is trying this change first to see if it helps process applications faster. If the library decides to expands the center’s hours, it would have to get approval through the U.S. Department of State.

“It appears there’s plenty of need because people still wait,” Holley said. “On a Saturday or a Sunday, the wait can be [long].”

The library’s passport center saw an increase in passport applications after the Collin County passport offices closed earlier this year. Holley also said the library’s center is popular because it offers evening and weekend hours.

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  1. Nice, can the library buy new books? Waiting time for books around 8 weeks!
    They got rid of Hoopla that other cities libraries provide and to top not enough books, no new books,no bestsellers.
    I pay taxes, want something in return.

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Lindsey Juarez Monsivais
Lindsey has been involved in newspapers in some form since high school. She graduated magna cum laude from the University of Texas at Arlington in 2014 with a degree in Journalism. While attending UTA, she worked for The Shorthorn, the university's award-winning student newspaper. She was hired as Community Impact Newspaper's first Frisco reporter in 2014. Less than a year later, she took over as the editor of the Frisco edition. Since then, she has covered a variety of topics and issues important to the community, including the city's affordable housing shortage, the state's controversial A-F school accountability system and the city's "Bury the Lines" efforts.
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