Hurts Donut Co. offers a variety unlike any other in Frisco

The Emergency Donut Vehicle makes regular visits to local neighborhoods on behalf of Hurts Donut Co. (Courtesy Hurts Donut Co.)
The Emergency Donut Vehicle makes regular visits to local neighborhoods on behalf of Hurts Donut Co. (Courtesy Hurts Donut Co.)

The Emergency Donut Vehicle makes regular visits to local neighborhoods on behalf of Hurts Donut Co. (Courtesy Hurts Donut Co.)

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Owner Keith Selby opened the Frisco location of Hurts Donut Co. in January 2017. (Courtesy Hurts Donut Co.)
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Hurts Donut Co. has 70 varieties of doughnuts the store rotates through on a regular basis. (Courtesy Hurts Donut Co.)
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The Cookie Monster is popular with Hurts Donut Co. customers of all ages in Frisco, owner Keith Selby said. (Courtesy Hurts Donut Co.)
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Owner Keith Selby said the Maple Bacon Me Crazy, which is a Long John doughnut with maple icing and bacon bits sprinkled on top, is one the most popular selections at Hurts Donut Co. in Frisco. (Courtesy Hurts Donut Co.)
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Hurts Donut Co. staff said the Jesús doughnut tastes like a churro. (Courtesy Hurts Donut Co.)
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Hurts Donut Co. has 70 varieties of doughnuts the store rotates through on a regular basis. (Courtesy Hurts Donut Co.)
While most emergency vehicles prompt people to get out of the way, Hurts Donut Co. has one that has been attracting crowds over the last six months. Its Emergency Donut Vehicle has been making regular visits to various Frisco neighborhoods during the coronavirus pandemic.

“The [customers] that aren’t getting out [and] aren’t going places—we actually come to them,” said Keith Selby, owner of Hurts Donut’s Frisco location. “They are just flabbergasted at the fact that we would come out and bring doughnuts to them.”

He said the doughnut delivery vehicle initially operated much like an ice cream truck. However, the business now picks a specific location in each neighborhood to allow for social distancing and safety for those lining up to get a treat.

That exposure has helped bring new visitors to the physical store. Selby estimated that about 40% of those coming through the doors at Hurts Donut are first-time visitors.

“When they come in, especially if they have kids with them, it’s like [they’re walking] into Disneyland,” Selby said. “They don’t expect two full cases of 59-plus different kinds of doughnuts and toppings and kolaches and cinnamon rolls and bacon bars. The typical doughnut shop here in Frisco is not our model.”


Weekends have proven to be the shop’s busiest time; Selby noted that the staff often makes as many as 3,500 doughnuts on Saturdays. However, at the beginning of the pandemic, even those days slowed considerably, and Hurts Donut reduced its hours. That proved to be an issue for the business, which had operated 24 hours a day since opening in January 2017.

“We didn’t even know where the key was to the doors,” Selby said. “We hadn’t locked them in three years.”

But after the downturn in March and April, Selby said the store returned to being open 24 hours a day, and year over year, sales have subsequently been up.

“The only difference is now a large portion of our sales—8%-10%—are actually deliveries,” he said. “A large percentage of those customers still do not want to go out.”

For those who do not want to wait for a visit from the Emergency Donut Vehicle, Selby said Hurts Donut also offers delivery options through DoorDash, Grubhub and Uber Eats.

Hurts Donut Co.

3288 Main St., Ste. 101, Frisco

469-214-8001

http://hurtsdonutco.com

Hours: Mon.-Sun. 12:01 a.m.-midnight

By William C. Wadsack
William C. Wadsack is editor of the Frisco edition of Community Impact Newspaper. He previously served as managing editor of several daily and weekly publications in North Texas and his native state of Louisiana before joining Community Impact Newspaper in 2019.


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