Dripping Springs ISD asks parents to opt into in-person or remote learning by Aug. 3

A phooto of Dripping Springs ISD's administrative HQ
While parents can select an online learning option, DSISD will be offering in-person classes on campuses five days a week during the 2020-21 school year. (Olivia Aldridge/Community Impact Newspaper)

While parents can select an online learning option, DSISD will be offering in-person classes on campuses five days a week during the 2020-21 school year. (Olivia Aldridge/Community Impact Newspaper)

Dripping Springs ISD begins its annual enrollment verification process July 29, which this year involves a declaration of intent for students to engage in either in-person or remote learning. While the first four weeks of school, beginning Aug. 18, will exclusively be conducted in a remote format, students and family have the choice to return to school in person beginning Sept. 8.

Parents and guardians have until Aug. 3 to select their students' learning format to allow the district enough time to plan for staffing, according to the district. Students will be able to switch to a different learning format each nine weeks if needed. Curriculum will be consistent across formats, although certain activities for asynchronous at-home learners—those whose families set their own flexible schedule—may differ somewhat.


According to the district, remote-learner families with limited home access to the internet or computer devices can contact the family access/student records specialist at their child's campus to check out a school-owned device or Wi-Fi hot spot.

Parents and guardians still deciding which learning format is right for their child can learn more about the benefits of in-person and remote learning on the DSISD website. The district has also released a "toolkit" to help parents plan for social-emotional learning at home.
By Olivia Aldridge

Multi-Platform Journalist

Olivia hosts and produces Community Impact Newspaper's podcasts, The Austin Breakdown, The Houston Breakdown and The DFW Breakdown. She launched the podcasts after nearly three years as a reporter for the newspaper, covering public health, business, development and Travis County government for the Central Austin edition. Olivia worked as a reporter and producer for South Carolina Public Radio before moving to Texas.