Work & Woof Coworking space offers dog owners a place to thrive

Jill Dretzka opened Work & Woof in 2018. (Photos by Nicholas Cicale/Community Impact Newspaper)
Jill Dretzka opened Work & Woof in 2018. (Photos by Nicholas Cicale/Community Impact Newspaper)

Jill Dretzka opened Work & Woof in 2018. (Photos by Nicholas Cicale/Community Impact Newspaper)

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Jill Dretzka gives treats to dogs at the daycare. (Photos by Nicholas Cicale/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Work & Woof has seating for on-site coworking. (Photos by Nicholas Cicale/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Work & Woof offers dog daycare and coworking opportunities. (Photos by Nicholas Cicale/Community Impact Newspaper)
Jill Dretzka opened South Austin coworking space Work & Woof in 2018 with two goals in mind—to offer remote workers a place to work while their dog had an opportunity to be social and exercise, and to open an indoor space where dogs could play and exercise when the Texas weather is not ideal. Originally from Southern California, Dretzka moved to Chicago in 2012 and was self-employed as a social media marketer. She said in Chicago she discovered the concept of coworking spaces—businesses that offer a space and resources that allow individuals to work and network remotely.

“I just loved the idea that I could have an actual office to go to and meet other entrepreneurs,” Dretzka said. “Getting to go out and network in the city helped get new clients instead of being held up in my apartment.”

However, when she moved to Austin in 2017 and adopted her dog, Lucca, she had trouble finding an affordable way to pay for both a coworking space and a dog day care. While some spaces allowed dogs to accompany workers, they either had to be booked far in advance or they did not accommodate the dogs, Dretzka said.

She said she started asking her neighbors and freelance friends about their past coworking experiences to gauge if there would be interest in a combined concept.

“They all said the same thing,” she said. “They have a coworking space, but never go because they felt so guilty about leaving the dog at home.”

For remote workers, Work & Woof offers offices that can be reserved, open desks and table seating. For their dogs, the facility has a large indoor play area that is fenced off from the workspace as well as an outdoor area. Dogs are also permitted in the work area with their owners. The business also offers a drop-off dog day care service, Dretzka said.

The business offers day-to-day pricing as well as monthly memberships. For a small group of coworkers, Work & Woof is close to a permanent office. However, Dretzka said, most of her clients work at the space a few times a week or a month, depending on their needs. Others pair on-site coworking with the drop-off day care service depending on their schedules.

“We have the coolest clients in the world,” she said. “We get to know our clients; we get to hang out with them, in addition to playing with dogs all day. How can you not think you have the coolest job in the world?”


Work & Woof


4930 S. Congress Ave., Bldg. A, Austin


512-460-1488




Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Nicholas Cicale



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