Kalahari, Round Rock amend $15M site improvement agreement

Less than nine months before the anticipated opening of Kalahari, Round Rock City Council approved an amendment related to payments for improvements on the site. (Rendering courtesy Kalahari Resorts & Conventions)
Less than nine months before the anticipated opening of Kalahari, Round Rock City Council approved an amendment related to payments for improvements on the site. (Rendering courtesy Kalahari Resorts & Conventions)

Less than nine months before the anticipated opening of Kalahari, Round Rock City Council approved an amendment related to payments for improvements on the site. (Rendering courtesy Kalahari Resorts & Conventions)

Less than nine months before the anticipated opening of Kalahari Resorts & Conventions, Round Rock City Council approved an amendment related to payments for improvements on the site.

In the original Onsite Public Improvement Agreement, signed April 26, 2018, the city of Round Rock agreed to pay up to $15 million for site improvements, such as roads, drainage and water and wastewater lines.

The original agreement stipulated that the payment would be made upon completion of the entire project. Now, Kalahari is asking for partial progress payments, City Attorney Steve Sheets said.

“That’s typically how we do public improvement projects,” Sheets said. “We are okay with recommending that agreement be approved.”

He said that, for example, as the work is 50% complete, Kalahari would receive 50% of the $15 million payment.


“Kalahari may, from time to time, make an application for payment for work done with respect to the onsite public improvements,” the amendment states. “Such application shall include a signed statement from Kalahari’s general contractor estimating, by value, the percent of the work completed with respect to the onsite public improvements.”

Council voted 6-0 to adopt the amendment Feb. 27 with Council Member Matt Baker absent for the vote.

Kalahari, located at Kenney Fort Boulevard and Hwy. 79, is expected to open with 975 hotel rooms, a 200,000-square-foot convention center, the largest indoor water park in the country, an outdoor entertainment space, restaurants and more in November.

Taylor Jackson Buchanan



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