Hutto diversity and inclusion commission approves 'no place for hate' recommendation

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The diversity and inclusion commission will meet with Chief of Police Paul Hall to discuss the Hutto Police Department 2020 racial profling report during its May meeting. (Megan Cardona/Community Impact Newspaper)

The diversity and inclusion commission will meet with Chief of Police Paul Hall to discuss the Hutto Police Department 2020 racial profling report during its May meeting. (Megan Cardona/Community Impact Newspaper)

The city of Hutto diversity and inclusion commission approved a resolution recommending Hutto City Council name the city a “no place for hate” during its meeting April 20.

The diversity and inclusion commission was created July 30, 2020, to advise and make recommendations to the City Council on policies, programs and activities related to equity on the basis of economic status, race, color, religion, gender and nationality, according to the city ordinance.



Part of the “no place for hate” resolution states that the city is welcoming of everyone and will protect the rights, freedoms, safety and security of all its residents and visitors. The end of the resolution recommends City Council reject, discourage and disapprove of any hate-based activity or conduct directed to harm a person due to a person’s immutable characteristics.

The commission also discussed the findings of the Hutto Police Department 2020 racial profiling report made during the March 18 City Council meeting. The commission initially planned to make recommendations based on the report during the meeting, but decided to wait for its May meeting so Chief of Police Paul Hall can be present and answer any questions members may have for clarification.

The commission meets the third Tuesday of every month at 6:30 p.m.

By Megan Cardona

Reporter, Round Rock, Pflugerville-Hutto

Megan is the Hutto reporter for Community Impact Newspaper's Round Rock and Pflugerville-Hutto editions. In 2020, she graduated with a degree in communication from UT-Arlington, where she worked at the student newspaper, The Shorthorn, for two years covering student affairs, campus administration and the city of Arlington.