Here’s what is on the ballot for Northwest Austin residents for the Nov. 6 election

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Several local, statewide and federal elections are taking place this November. Here is a look at what is on the ballot for residents in the Northwest Austin area.

Early voting is Oct. 22-Nov. 2, and Election Day is Nov. 6.

Statewide

U.S. senator
Ted Cruz
Beto O’Rourke
Neal M. Dikeman

Governor
Greg Abbott
Lupe Valdez
Mark Jay Tippetts

Lieutenant governor
Dan Patrick
Mike Collier
Kerry Douglas McKennon

Attorney general
Ken Paxton
Justin Nelson
Michael Ray Harris

Comptroller of public accounts
Glenn Hegar
Joi Chevalier
Ben Sanders

Commissioner of the General Land Office
George P. Bush
Miguel Suazo
Matt Piña

Commissioner of agriculture
Sid Miller
Kim Olson
Richard Carpenter

Railroad commissioner
Christi Craddick
Roman McAllen
Mike Wright

Local

U.S. HOUSE

Representative, District 10
Michael T. McCaul
Mike Siegel
Mike Ryan

Representative, District 17
Bill Flores
Rick Kennedy
Peter Churchman

Representative, District 31
John Carter
Mary Jennings “MJ” Hegar
Jason Hope

Representative, District 136
Tony Dale
John H Bucy III
Zack Parks

TEXAS SENATE

Senator, District 5
Charles Schwertner
Meg Walsh
Amy Lyons

Senator, District 14
George W. Hindman
Kirk Watson
Micah M. Verlander

TEXAS HOUSE

Representative, District 46
Gabriel Nila
Sheryl Cole
Kevin Ludlow

Representative, District 47
Paul D. Workman
Vikki Goodwin

Representative, District 49
Kyle Austin
Gina Hinojosa

TRAVIS COUNTY

County clerk
Dana DeBeauvoir
Erica Lockwood

Precinct No. 2, justice of the peace
Chris Soileau
Randall Slagle
Christopher David

WILLIAMSON COUNTY

County judge
Bill Gravell
Blane Conklin
William (Bill) Kelberlau

Commissioner, Precinct 2
Cynthia Long
Kasey Redus

Judge, Court-at-Law 1
Brandy Hallford
Don Morehart

County clerk
Nancy E. Rister
Jessica Tiedt

County treasurer
Scott Heselmeyer
Omar Kadir

Justice of the peace, Precinct 1
Dain Johnson
KT Musselman

Justice of the peace, Precinct 2
Edna Staudt
Audrey Amos-McGehee

CITY OF AUSTIN

Mayor
Steve Adler
Gustavo “Gus” Peña
Todd Phelps
Alexander Strenger
Alan Pease
Laura Morrison
Travis Duncan

Bond election
Proposition A, Affordable Housing
The issuance of $250,000,000 in tax supported general obligation bonds and notes for planning, constructing, renovating, improving, and equipping affordable housing facilities for low income and moderate income persons and families, and acquiring land and interests in land and property necessary to do so, funding loans and grants for affordable housing, and funding affordable housing programs, as may be permitted by law; and the levy of a tax sufficient to pay for the bonds and notes.

Proposition B, Libraries, Museums and Cultural Arts Facilities
The issuance of $128,000,000 in tax supported general obligation bonds and notes for planning, acquiring, constructing, renovating, improving, and equipping community and cultural facilities, libraries, museums, and cultural and creative arts facilities, and acquiring land and interests in land and property necessary to do so; and the levy of a tax sufficient to pay for the bonds and notes.

Proposition C, Parks and Recreation
The issuance of $149,000,000 in tax supported general obligation bonds and notes for planning, acquiring, constructing, renovating, improving and equipping public parks, recreation centers, natural areas, and other related facilities, including, without limitation, playgrounds, hike and bike trails, sports courts, and swimming pools, and acquiring land and interests in land and property necessary to do so; and the levy of a tax sufficient to pay for the bonds and notes.

Proposition D, Flood Mitigation, Open Space and Water Quality Protection
The issuance of $184,000,000 in tax supported general obligation bonds and notes for flood mitigation, open space and water quality and quantity for planning, designing, acquiring, constructing, and installing improvements and facilities for flood control, erosion control, water quality, water quantity, and storm-water drainage, and acquiring land, open spaces, and interests in land and property necessary to do so; and the levy of a tax sufficient to pay for the bonds and notes.

Proposition E, Health and Human Services
The issuance of $16,000,000 in tax supported general obligation bonds and notes for planning, constructing, reconstructing, improving, and equipping a neighborhood public health and human services facility in the Dove Springs area; and the levy of a tax sufficient to pay for the bonds and notes.

Proposition F, Public Safety
The issuance of $38,000,000 in tax supported general obligation bonds and notes for planning, renovating, improving, and equipping existing public safety facilities, specifically fire and emergency medical services stations, buildings, and other related facilities; and the levy of a tax sufficient to pay for the bonds and notes.

Proposition G, Transportation Infrastructure
The issuance of $160,000,000 in tax supported general obligation bonds and notes for planning, constructing, reconstructing, and improving roads, streets, intersections, sidewalks, bridges, urban trails and related utility and drainage infrastructure for the roads and streets; improving traffic signal synchronization and control systems; acquiring and installing traffic signals; and acquiring land and interests in land and property necessary to do so; and the levy of a tax sufficient to pay for the bonds and the notes.

Charter election
Proposition H, Planning Commission
Shall the City Charter be amended to provide that the term of service and process for removal of the Planning Commission members be determined by ordinance?

Proposition I, Non-substantive corrections to Charter
Shall the City Charter be amended to make non-substantive corrections to grammar, typographical errors, capitalization, punctuation, and sentence structure; and to change or remove charter language that is obsolete?

Special election
Proposition J, Land Development Code
Shall a City ordinance be adopted to require both a waiting period and subsequent voter approval period, a total of up to three years, before future comprehensive revisions of the City’s land development code become effective?

Proposition K, Citizen-initiated ordinance regarding an efficiency study
Without using the existing internal City Auditor or existing independent external auditor, shall the City Code be amended to require an efficiency study of the City’s operational and fiscal performance performed by a third-party audit consultant, at an estimated cost of $1 million-$5 million?

NORTH AUSTIN MUNICIPAL UTILITY DISTRICT NO. 1

Place 4, director
Donald Ayers
Diana Christiano

AUSTIN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Place 7, trustee
Mitch Fuller
Barbara P. Mink

Place 8, trustee
Douglas Gibbins
Stephanie Gharakhanian
Sarah Mills

Place 9, trustee
Julie Ann Nitsch
Lora H. Weber

AUSTIN ISD

District 4, trustee
Kristin Ashy
Zachary Price

At large Position 9, trustee
Sam Russo
Arati Singh
Carmen Tilton

PFLUGERVILLE ISD

Bond election
Proposition A
The issuance of $332,000,000 bonds for school buildings, school sites, school buses, and the levying of the tax in payment thereof

Proposition B
Approving the ad valorem tax rate of $1.52 per $100 valuation in the Pflugerville Independent School District for the current year, a rate that is $0.02 higher per $100 valuation than the school district rollback tax rate, for the purpose of maintenance and operations, (including a maintenance and operations component of the ad valorem tax rate equal to $1.06 per $100 valuation, a rate that is $0.02 higher than the current maintenance and operations tax rate)

ROUND ROCK ISD

Place 3, trustee
Amber Feller
Danielle Weston

Place 4, trustee
Stuart Litwin
David G. Schmidt
Cory Renee Vessa
Edward L. Hanna

Place 5, trustee
Amy Weir
Suzi David

Place 6, trustee
Ching Choy
Steven E. Math
Jarrad Brenek

Bond election
Proposition A
The issuance of $508,435,000 of School Building Bonds for acquiring, constructing, renovating, improving and equipping school buildings, including an aquatic facility and acquiring technology replacements, upgrades and improvements, for the purchase of necessary sites for school buildings and for the purchase of new school buses; and the levying of a tax sufficient, without limit as to rate or amount, to pay the principal of and interest on the Bonds and to pay the costs of any credit agreements executed or authorized in anticipation of, in relation to or in connection with the Bonds

Get to know the statewide positions

U.S. senators
Texas’ two U.S. senators each serve staggered, six-year terms with no term limits. Ted Cruz has been in office since 2012, while the second seat has been held by John Cornyn since 2002.

Governor
The governor serves as the chief executive of Texas and can serve an unlimited number of four-year terms. The governor offers policy recommendations and may introduce bills, and is also responsible for appointing state board and commission members.

Lieutenant governor
The lieutenant governor serves as president of the state Senate and is responsible for establishing committees and appointing members.

Attorney general
The attorney general is the lawyer for the state of Texas and is responsible for defending the state’s constitutional laws, representing the state in litigation and approving public bond issues, among other duties. The attorney general is elected to four-year terms.

Comptroller of public accounts
The comptroller is responsible for managing the state’s finances by acting as its tax collector, accountant and treasurer. The comptroller is elected to four-year terms.

Commissioner of the General Land Office
The land commissioner manages state assets, investments and mineral rights and also leads numerous boards and commissions. The commissioner is elected to four-year terms.

Commissioner of agriculture
The agriculture commissioner manages consumer protection, agriculture, healthy living and economic development programs. The commissioner is elected to four-year terms.

Railroad commissioner
Three commissioners are elected to six-year terms. A railroad commissioner has policy- and rule-making responsibilities for the commission, which, despite its name, no longer oversees Texas railroads. The commission now regulates the oil and natural gas industry.

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COMMENT
  1. Sheryl Zettner

    There was a time when community impact gave really nice voter guides. It’s easy enough to find out who and what is on the ballot from the county. I don’t see the purpose to this page.

  2. Thanks, this was REALLY, REALLY, helpful. Going to save me a lot of time getting ready to vote and make it possible to vote sooner.

    I don’t know what Sheryl Zettner was looking for; perhaps gold embossing, or maybe, you were supposed to tell her who to vote for?!!! You know Democrats and Republicans each have their own handle on community! LOL!

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