Williamson County officials discuss how to spend remaining federal coronavirus relief funding

Williamson County Commissioners Court will discuss allocating the remaining CARES Act funding during its Dec. 14 meeting. (Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)
Williamson County Commissioners Court will discuss allocating the remaining CARES Act funding during its Dec. 14 meeting. (Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)

Williamson County Commissioners Court will discuss allocating the remaining CARES Act funding during its Dec. 14 meeting. (Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)

Williamson County staff will reach out to local schools following the commissioners court meeting Dec. 7 to see if they have any additional expenses eligible for reimbursement under the federal Coronavirus Aid Relief and Economic Security Act.

County Treasurer Scott Heselmeyer said the county has approximately $18 million remaining of the $93.4 million Williamson County received from the CARES Act.

Heselmeyer said he will contact local districts—and at the request of Precinct 2 Commissioner Cynthia Long, charter and private schools—to see what their outstanding needs are.

These schools will then submit an application for additional funding by the end of the week. Commissioners court will discuss allocating the remaining CARES Act dollars during its Dec. 14 meeting, Heselmeyer said.

Local governments have until Dec. 31 to use the relief funding for expenditures incurred as a result of COVID-19. Any funds left unencumbered at the end of the year will be returned to the federal government, Heselmeyer said.


“One of the things that we’ve been intentional about is not spending money just for the sake of spending money,” Heselmeyer said. “We will have a significant amount left over that I think we are going to be spending back.”

Additionally, Heselmeyer said the county will review its existing expenses to ensure all eligible expenditures have been paid for by the CARES Act.

“We’ve provided many opportunities as a court in different agencies and the fact is ... there were funds left over,” County Judge Bill Gravell said. “I’m proud of what we’ve been able to do to help those in a time of need.”
By Claire Shoop

Reporter, Sugar Land/Missouri City

Claire joined Community Impact Newspaper in September 2019 as the reporter for the Sugar Land/Missouri City edition and in December 2021 moved to Austin to become the reporter for the Northwest Austin edition. She graduated from The University of Texas at Austin in May 2019 where she studied journalism, government and Arabic. While in school, Claire was a fellow for The Texas Tribune, worked for the student newspaper, The Daily Texan, and spent a semester in Washington, D.C. She enjoys playing cards with her family and listening to the Boss, Bruce Springsteen.