Austin Public Health confirms first case of measles in Travis County since 1999; exposure includes areas of Northwest Austin

vaccine
Austin Public Health has confirmed the first case of measles in Travis County since 1999. (Courtesy Fotolia)

Austin Public Health has confirmed the first case of measles in Travis County since 1999. (Courtesy Fotolia)

Austin Public Health officials confirmed Dec. 22 that a person has been diagnosed with measles, marking the first case in Travis County since 1999.

Officials are working with health departments in Central Texas to inform individuals who may have been exposed to the person with measles at locations in Austin, including businesses in Northwest Austin, according to a news release.

The public health department recommends people who were at the below sites on the dates listed to call their doctor immediately if they develop a fever before Jan. 1.

The sites and dates of possible exposure include:

  • Dec. 14 (evening)

    • Chipotle Mexican Grill, 6301 W. Parmer Lane, Austin



  • Dec. 14-16

    • H-E-B, 6001 W. Parmer Lane, Austin



  • Dec. 15

    • Sip Saam Thai, 6301 W. Parmer Lane, Austin



  • Dec. 15-16

    • Mandola’s Italian, 4700 W. Guadalupe St., Austin



  • Dec. 16 from 2 p.m.-4 p.m.

    • Target, 10107 Research Blvd., Austin

    • Marco’s Pizza, 11011 Research Blvd., Austin



  • Dec. 17 from noon-4 p.m.

    • Austin-Bergstrom International Airport, 3600 Presidential Blvd., United Airlines, gate 29 area




Measles is a virus that is spread from one person to another through the air when the infected person coughs or sneezes, according to Austin Public Health. People who have not received the measles vaccine are considered at a high risk for contracting the virus, and the virus can be considered serious in one in four cases.

“Measles is an acute, highly contagious viral disease. A small number of cases are capable of quickly producing epidemics," said Dr. Mark Escott, interim health authority and medical director for Austin Public Health. "The best way to protect yourself and your family against measles and other vaccine-preventable diseases is by immunization."


The public health department recommends children receive the first dose of the measles vaccines between 12 and 15 months and receive a second dose between 4 and 6 years.

For more information, visit www.austintexas.gov/measles.
By Amy Denney
Amy has worked for Community Impact Newspaper since September 2010, serving as reporter and then senior editor for the Northwest Austin edition and covering transportation. She is now managing editor for the nine publications in the Central Texas area.


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