Oak Ridge North considers rainwater harvesting education program

The city of Oak Ridge North is considering a rainwater harvesting program for 2015 to help residents save on irrigation costs and improve water conservation efforts, City Manager Vicky Rudy said.



Rainwater harvesting systems allow residents to collect rainwater as it runs off from a high point, such as a rooftop, and store it in a barrel for later use. Harvested water is typically used for irrigation systems as users are able to run drip irrigation lines or water spouts directly into their garden, said Bob Dailey, public education coordinator for The Woodlands Joint Powers Agency.



The ORN program could include education efforts, a town hall meeting where residents can learn about rain harvesting systems and their installation, and opportunities to preorder discounted rain harvesting barrels from retailers through a partnership with the city, Rudy said.



"It would be a small program," she said. "It is going to be about 33 to 66 people that are likely to be interested in this program here. I think we would probably end up [hosting a meeting] twice because I feel the first time it is an [educational experience] for people—your pioneers will come out and try it, then their neighbors will see it and the next time they will go, 'Oh, I would like to do that.'"



The WJPA launched a similar program in summer 2013—offering The Woodlands residents opportunities to preorder rain barrels at a discounted cost through the agency. The agency sold 600 rain barrels during the first pick up date, followed up by another 100 barrels as residents learned about the rain harvesting systems from their neighbors, Dailey said.



"Even the people that were supplying the rain barrels were amazed because they had never sold that many before," Dailey said.



Rudy said educating residents about local water issues is important for water conservation in Montgomery County.



"They are raising children who are also learning this in school, but they need to see water conservation in action if we are going to change the way people use water," Rudy said. "It is one of those commitments we need to make to our community and the earth because it is a critical moment in time in terms of water supply."



MOST RECENT

The Woodlands board members seated the podium
Intersection needs at Research Forest Drive and Grogan's Mill Road discussed at The Woodlands board meeting

An intersection project at Research Forest Drive and Grogan’s Mill Road last discussed in depth in 2018 was back on The Woodlands Township agenda for discussion Oct. 21.

From left: Laura Ryan, Eliza Paul and Craig Raborn discuss the future of the Texas Department of Transportation. (Sierra Rozen/Community Impact Newspaper)
Texas Department of Transportation discusses I-45 expansion, vehicle fatalities at annual event

The Texas Department of Transportation held its fifth annual State of TxDOT event Oct. 21 to discuss the I-45 expansion, plans for the future and safety issues facing Texans.

The Montgomery County Animal Shelter closed down several services for two months to deal with a distemper outbreak. (Jishnu Nair/Community Impact Newspaper)
Montgomery County Animal Shelter reopens stray animal intake

The county shelter closed down several services for two months to deal with a distemper outbreak.

Taco Palenque is now open as drive-thru only in Round Rock. (Brooke Sjoberg/Community Impact Newspaper)
CI NATION ROUNDUP: Taco Palenque opens in Round Rock; Plano ISD considering two draft calendars for 2022-23 school year and more top news

Take a look at the top five trending stories across all of Community Impact Newspaper’s coverage areas as of Oct. 21.

The ACLU of Texas filed a lawsuit against Magnolia ISD Oct. 21 over the district's gender-based hair policy. (Community Impact staff)
American Civil Liberties Union of Texas sues Magnolia ISD over gender-based hair policy

The lawsuit alleges the district's policy violates the Equal Protection Clause and Title IX.

JAX Burgers, Fries & Shakes is the latest restaurant in the mixed-use development of Metropark Square. (Ally Bolender/Community Impact Newspaper)
JAX Burger, Fries & Shakes now open in Metropark Square

The newest JAX location is across from the AMC Theatre.

The Village of Indian Springs is the smallest of The Woodlands Township’s villages. (Ally Bolender/Community Impact Newspaper)
Learn about our October featured neighborhood, Indian Springs

Named after the Native American artifacts discovered in the area from the Bidai tribe of the Atakapan people, Indian Springs is the smallest village in The Woodlands.

Renderings of the conceptual tower were shown depicting a roughly 100-foot tower, but the intent is to build a smaller tower. A total of $2.43 million was given as an estimated cost for a 100-foot gravity tower, but presenters said the cost would scale down with a smaller tower. (Courtesy city of Frisco)
CI NATION ROUNDUP: Early concept for Frisco’s Northwest Community Park includes biking tower for ‘gravity riding’; Perky Beans Cafe now open in Leander, and more top news

Take a look at the top five trending stories across all of Community Impact Newspaper’s coverage areas as of Oct. 20.

CISD board President Skeeter Hubert and Superintendent Curtis Null spoke about the significance of the new school during the ceremony before Ruben W. Hope III addressed the audience and shared stories about his father. (Courtesy Conroe ISD)
Conroe ISD dedicates Ruben W. Hope, Jr. Elementary School

CISD board President Skeeter Hubert and Superintendent Curtis Null spoke about the significance of the new school during the ceremony before Ruben W. Hope III addressed the audience and shared stories about his father. 

Heather Lagrone, Adrienne Holloway, Luis Guajardo, Maya Ford and Charleen Jones sit onstage while Holloway introduces the audience to the Harris County Housing Needs Assessment study on Oct. 19. (Emily Lincke/Community Impact Newspaper)
Kinder Institute housing survey results reveal Harris County's needs

To meet the need for additional, more affordable housing for only 20% of the 500,000 cost-burdened residents, 8,174 housing units would need to be added annually through 2031, according to the study.