New Braunfel’s Common Street project is ahead of schedule

Community Impact Newspaper
Community Impact Newspaper

Community Impact Newspaper

The city of New Braunfels is ahead of schedule on an estimated six-month project that began on Common Street in November. The project includes road repairs and improvements to pedestrian accommodations on a roughly one-mile stretch of roadway between Gruene Road and Sundance Parkway. According to city officials, affected traffic lanes will be shifted in various areas from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. for the duration of the project.

Timeline: November-March


Cost: $923,408

Funding source: city of New Braunfels 2013 bond
By Ian Pribanic

Ian Pribanic covers city government, transportation, business and education news for Community Impact Newspaper in the Keller-Roanoke-Northeast Fort Worth areas. A Washington D.C. native and University of North Texas graduate, Ian was previously an editor for papers in Oklahoma, West Texas and for Community Impact in New Braunfels.


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