City of New Braunfels downtown lighting ceremony set for Nov. 22

Downtown New Braunfels celebrates the holiday season by decorating the town with lights. (Courtesy New Braunfels Parks & Recreation Dept.)
The city of New Braunfels will celebrate the holiday season with a downtown lighting ceremony Nov. 22. (Courtesy New Braunfels Parks & Recreation Dept.)

The city of New Braunfels will celebrate the holiday season with a downtown lighting ceremony Nov. 22. (Courtesy New Braunfels Parks & Recreation Dept.)

"A hundred thousand twinkling lights" will soon shine on downtown New Braunfels.

The city of New Braunfels is inviting citizens to kick-off the holiday season with its annual downtown lighting ceremony and the arrival of Santa Claus, according to a city news release.

Mayor Barron Casteel will “flip the switch” to officially light downtown New Braunfels on Nov. 22 at 6 p.m. Santa Claus will arrive on a vintage fire truck.

The New Braunfels Community Band will perform at 6:45 p.m. and will be followed by the Canyon High School Steel Drum Band at 7:30 p.m., the release said.

"The dazzling display of low-energy and sustainable LED lights stretches through downtown and will remain lit for the holiday season," according to the release.


During the festivities, pictures with Santa Claus and holiday treats will be available for purchase from the New Braunfels Downtown Association on the main bandstand. Photos will be digital print-only and cost $10.

For more information, contact the city of New Braunfels Parks and Recreation Department at 830-221-4350 or go to www.nbtexas.org.
By Lauren Canterberry
Lauren Canterberry began covering New Braunfels for Community Impact Newspaper in 2019. Her reporting focuses on education, development and breaking news. Lauren is originally from South Carolina and graduated from the University of Georgia in 2017.


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