New 38-acre residential development coming to New Braunfels

City staff displayed a rendering of home concepts that could be part of the newly approved subdivision in New Braunfels. (Screenshot courtesy city of New Braunfels)
City staff displayed a rendering of home concepts that could be part of the newly approved subdivision in New Braunfels. (Screenshot courtesy city of New Braunfels)

City staff displayed a rendering of home concepts that could be part of the newly approved subdivision in New Braunfels. (Screenshot courtesy city of New Braunfels)

New Braunfels City Council took the initial steps toward the creation of a new residential subdivision during its first meeting of 2021.

Though a second reading of the rezoning request will take place Jan. 25, officials gave the green light Jan. 11 to rezone 38 acres in New Braunfels that lie northeast of Hwy. 46 between the Stonegate and Windover Farms neighborhoods.



Planning and Services Director Christopher Looney told council Jan. 11 that the representative of the property requested it be rezoned from a planned development district to zero lot line home district, or ZHA.

“Just because it has that ZHA district designation doesn’t meant that’s all that can be developed in that district,” Looney said. “ZHA does allow zero lot line homes, but the vast majority of ZHA districts are developed as single family homes.”


City information lists the developer of the project as Brass Real Estates Fund IV of San Antonio.

Looney said the ZHA zoning is consistent with the property’s surrounding developments and would allow for a variety of different housing types, which Looney said was in accordance with the land use provisions of the city’s updated comprehensive plan.

Looney said that since rezoning has been approved by council, the next step for developers will be to create a master plan and subdivide, or plat, the property.

The platting stage will then require further action from the developer, including a drainage study and a traffic impact analysis, he said.

“Typically, developments of this size do have to do a traffic impact analysis,” Looney said. “That will give an indication of what the developer may be required to improve in either on-site or adjoining properties to mitigate any negative impacts from traffic increases.”
By Brian Rash
Brian has been a reporter and editor since 2012. He wrote about the music scene in Dallas-Fort Worth before becoming managing editor for the Graham Leader in Graham, Texas, in 2013. He relocated to Austin, Texas, in 2015 to work for Gatehouse Media's large design hub. He became the editor for the Lake Travis-Westlake publication of Community Impact in August 2018. From there he became a dual-market editor for Community Impact's New Braunfels and San Marcos-Buda-Kyle editions. Brian is now a senior editor for the company's flagship papers, the Round Rock and Pflugerville-Hutto editions.