Lake Travis residents get an eyeful as Thunderbirds fly overhead in salute to frontline workers

The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds passed over the Lake Travis area at about 4 p.m. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)
The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds passed over the Lake Travis area at about 4 p.m. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)

The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds passed over the Lake Travis area at about 4 p.m. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)

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Dozens of people had high access to view the Thunderbirds from atop Baylor Scott & White Medical Center-Lakeway. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Throughout the Lake Travis area, people stopped to get a view of the flyover. (Phyllis Campos/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Spectators wait to get a view of the flyover. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Spectators wait to get a view of the flyover. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Spectators wait to get a view of the flyover. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Spectators wait to get a view of the flyover. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)
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A man waits for the Thunderbirds to approach from inside Baylor Scott & White Medical Center-Lakeway. (Phyllis Campos/Community Impact Newspaper)
The roof of the Baylor Scott & White Medical Center-Lakeway parking garage was unusually packed for 3:30 p.m. on a Wednesday afternoon, especially considering the hundreds of parking spaces that automobiles passed on their way to the top tier.

The reason more than 100 people gathered their the afternoon of May 13 was to witness the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds fly over the Lake Travis area.


It was just one stop on a two-metropolitan cruise that included San Antonio and multiple spots in Greater Austin, and the Thunderbirds made the flight as a salute to first responders and frontline workers who have continued their efforts throughout the ongoing COVID-19 crisis.

The roof of the Lakeway hospital's parking garage provided a panoramic view of the surrounding landscape, much of which was crowded with cars and people who had also stopped that afternoon to get a glimpse of the fanfare.
By Brian Rash
Brian has been a reporter and editor since 2012. He wrote about the music scene in Dallas-Fort Worth before becoming managing editor for the Graham Leader in Graham, Texas, in 2013. He relocated to Austin, Texas, in 2015 to work for Gatehouse Media's large design hub. He became the editor for the Lake Travis-Westlake publication of Community Impact in August 2018. From there he became a dual-market editor for Community Impact's New Braunfels and San Marcos-Buda-Kyle editions. Brian is now a senior editor for the company's flagship papers, the Round Rock and Pflugerville-Hutto editions.