Ochna Health offers membership-based health care in Georgetown

Ochna Health offers membership-based health care in GeorgetownWhen Dr. Chau Nguyen worked as a physician at an Austin-area clinic for seven years, he said he noticed several of his patients were having trouble affording a visit to the clinic. 


Several told Nguyen that because of high deductibles they could not afford to see a doctor or have any tests done.


In response, Nguyen said he decided to open his own membership-based primary-care practice, Ochna Health, in April. He said the model should make the clinic more affordable for his patients and allow him to spend more time with them.


“What I’ve found is there’s a lot of costs associated with the insurance company, and there are other markups that I tried to remove and offer the patient a better service for a lower cost,” he said.


The doctor offers primary-care services, including preventive care and minor procedures, for patients of all ages. He said no patient is turned away for pre-existing conditions.


Patients can visit Ochna Health without being a member of the clinic and pay a flat fee. If patients choose to become members they have access to unlimited office visits, complimentary in-office procedures and a yearly physical that includes basic lab tests. Nguyen also offers unlimited phone calls, text messages, and email or video chats with patients.


His new model has worked well for Christal Albert, who began seeing Nguyen five years ago. She said she started going to his new clinic because he is a thorough doctor who cares about his patients’ physical and mental states.


“I can come in and see him whenever I need to,” she said. “It seems to be a very good idea.”


Ochna Health offers plans for individuals, and small businesses can participate through a health-cost sharing program called Liberty Direct. The health program offers complete health coverage that shares preventive expenses, and the monthly cost includes the price of membership for Ochna Health, Nguyen said.


Individuals with insurance are also accepted, though Nguyen said his model largely cuts out the administrative cost and need for insurance.


“We cut out the [insurance] costs and give the patients more time, because we don’t have to spend more time doing billing and paperwork,” he said. “We pass the savings, both in time and money, to the patient.”


Ochna Health


4749 Williams Drive, Ste. 304, Georgetown
512-348-6399 • www.ochnahealth.com
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. or by appointment for after-hour care, Sat. morning by appointment, closed Sun.

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By Caitlin Perrone

Caitlin covers Cedar Park and Leander city councils and reports on education, transportation, government and business news. She is an alumnus of The University of Texas at Austin. Most recently, Caitlin produced a large-scale investigative project with The Dallas Morning News and led education coverage in the Brazos Valley at The Bryan-College Station Eagle. After interning with Community Impact Newspaper for two summers, she joined the staff as a reporter in 2015.


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