Yaghi's New York Pizzeria offering fresh yet affordable options since 1999

Abed Yaghi makes a margherita pizza. (Sally Grace Holtgrieve/Community Impact Newspaper)
Abed Yaghi makes a margherita pizza. (Sally Grace Holtgrieve/Community Impact Newspaper)

Abed Yaghi makes a margherita pizza. (Sally Grace Holtgrieve/Community Impact Newspaper)

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Abed Yaghi makes a margherita pizza. (Sally Grace Holtgrieve/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Abed Yaghi makes a margherita pizza. (Sally Grace Holtgrieve/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Kahl Yaghi started the pizzeria franchise in 1999. (Sally Grace Holtgrieve/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Yaghi's offers a lunch special: any two slices and a drink for $5.99. (Sally Grace Holtgrieve/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Yaghi's offers a lunch special: any two slices and a drink for $5.99. (Sally Grace Holtgrieve/Community Impact Newspaper)
Khal Yaghi wished there was a local pizza place that sold large, affordable pies made with fresh, quality ingredients. He called his brother Abed, who was making and selling pizza in New York, where Khal had moved from, and suggested they open a restaurant.

That was 1999. Now there are eight Yaghi's locations: six in the Austin area, one in San Antonio and one in Copperas Cove.

“The way we see the market, there’s the sit-down, brick oven places where you get a 10- to 12-inch pizza with wine, and you end up paying quite a bit for that,” Yaghi said. “Then you have the Domino’s and Pizza Hut chains. But what’s in the middle? There’s a void.”

Yaghi’s aims to fill that void, selling gourmet pizzas without the gourmet pricing, he said. Ingredients are locally sourced, and toppings such as peppers, tomatoes, onions and more are chopped fresh daily. The pizza dough and secret sauce recipe are also made in-house each day, along with meats.

“That’s something a lot of people stopped doing because of the labor and know-how,” Yaghi said. “But our background is in meat. We make our sausage in-house; the meatballs are rolled one at a time; and we marinate and cook the chicken in our stone ovens.”

The Buffalo chicken wings are a customer favorite, praised for their right size, being cooked “just right” and secret sauce, Yaghi added. He said calzones, zitis and the other menu items are never premade; rather they are baked fresh when ordered.

"When you start with fresh bread and sauce, add meats that are all-natural and fresh vegetables," he said, "how can you not have a great product?"
www.yaghispizzeria.com

Yaghi's Georgetown

4500 Williams Drive, Ste. 200

512-868-9991

Yaghi's Pflugerville

1552 FM 685

512-989-2626

Yaghi's Cedar Park #1

2100 Cypress Creed Road

512-401-0011

Yaghi's Cedar Park #2

920 N. Vista Ridge Blvd.

512-260-1010

Yaghi's Bee Cave

12400 Highway 71 West

512-402-0202

Yaghi's Southwest Austin

4220 W. William Cannon Drive

512-891-7900
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By Sally Grace Holtgrieve

Sally Grace Holtgrieve solidified her passion for news during her time as Editor-in-Chief of Christopher Newport University's student newspaper, The Captain's Log. She started her professional career at The Virginia Gazette and moved to Texas in 2015 to cover government and politics at The Temple Daily Telegram. She started working at Community Impact Newspaper in February 2018 as the Lake Travis-Westlake reporter and moved into the role of Georgetown editor in June 2019.


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