DATA: About 1.5% of Texans remain uncounted in 2020 census

About 1.5% of Texans remain uncounted in the 2020 census as of Sept. 29. (Chance Flowers/Community Impact Newspaper)
About 1.5% of Texans remain uncounted in the 2020 census as of Sept. 29. (Chance Flowers/Community Impact Newspaper)

About 1.5% of Texans remain uncounted in the 2020 census as of Sept. 29. (Chance Flowers/Community Impact Newspaper)

Sept. 30 is the last day to complete the 2020 census, a decennial count of all the people living in the country as of April 1.

As of Sept. 29, about 1.5% of Texans remained unaccounted for, according to U.S. Census Bureau data.

For every 1% of residents who go uncounted, the state of Texas stands to lose hundreds of millions of dollars, as census data is used to distribute $675 billion in federal funding to states based on population, which is then funneled down to the local level, officials said.

So far, about 98.5% of Texas residents completed the census with 62.1% self-responding and 36.4% of responses collected by an enumerator collecting door-to-door responses, data shows. The national total is 97.9%, with 66.4% self-responding and 31.5% counted by an enumerator, it said.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, timelines for census completion have shifted. The bureau initially extended its completion deadline to Oct. 31 but announced Aug. 3 that it shortened its timeline to end operations by Sept. 30 to meet a statutory deadline of a completed census delivered to the president by Dec. 31.


Here is where Central Texas census completion stands so far. Percentages may not sum due to rounding, per the report.


By Ali Linan
Ali Linan began covering Georgetown for Community Impact Newspaper in 2018. Her reporting focuses on education and Williamson County. Ali hails from El Paso and graduated from Syracuse University in 2017.


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