New Georgetown brewery Barking Armadillo offers growlers to go, stays positive despite taproom closure 4 days after grand opening

Barking Armadillo Brewing temporarily closed its taproom the week following its grand opening celebration. (Courtesy Barking Armadillo Brewing)
Barking Armadillo Brewing temporarily closed its taproom the week following its grand opening celebration. (Courtesy Barking Armadillo Brewing)

Barking Armadillo Brewing temporarily closed its taproom the week following its grand opening celebration. (Courtesy Barking Armadillo Brewing)

Image description
Barking Armadillo Brewing temporarily closed its taproom the week following its grand opening celebration. (Courtesy Barking Armadillo Brewing)
Image description
Barking Armadillo Brewing temporarily closed its taproom the week following its grand opening celebration. (Courtesy Barking Armadillo Brewing)
Image description
Barking Armadillo Brewing temporarily closed its taproom the week following its grand opening celebration. (Courtesy Barking Armadillo Brewing)
Image description
Barking Armadillo Brewing temporarily closed its taproom the week following its grand opening celebration. (Courtesy Barking Armadillo Brewing)

After years of preparation and anticipation, Barking Armadillo Brewing had its grand opening celebration in Georgetown on March 14. On March 18 the brewery had to temporarily shut down after Williamson County mandated all dine-in areas close to the public.

Barking Armadillo is offering curbside pickup for growler orders, though, and co-owners Jacob and Amanda Trimm and Bryan Cantu said they look forward to opening the taproom back up once sanctions are lifted.

Brewing started out as a hobby for Jacob and Cantu.

“[We were] just homebrewing for our own enjoyment because we simply loved craft beer,” they said. “Over time, our beer was shared with our friends and family, and we got feedback that we needed to start our own brewery. Really it's all about sharing experiences with the community.”

The group was intrigued by the infinite amount of possibilities involving the four main ingredients in beer–water, hops, grain and yeast.



“There's so much science behind beer making and fine details to perfect recipes; we enjoy the never-ending learning that comes with perfecting our craft,” they said.

The team visited over 100 breweries nationally and internationally and sampled a variety of craft beers. Aspects and qualities from favorites have been incorporated into Barking Armadillo brews.

They also spent time training at a Colorado immersion program and gained access to a community of other microbreweries around the nation.

As for the name, it came to be while the group was brewing in their garage on a 100-degree day, Amanda said.

“We started out with wanting to name the brewery after our dogs, but also wanted something that was clearly from Texas by the name and to not be taken too seriously,” she said. “Under the influence of a few beers, of course, the name Barking Armadillo evolved–armadillos don't actually bark.”

Amanda said the forced closure has been hard on all businesses.

“Of course it's sort of soul-crushing to work so hard for several months to have things come to a halt, but we want the community to know we're not going anywhere,” she said. “The craft beer and Georgetown community have been very supportive, and we're staying positive through all this.”

The team plans to have a grand reopening celebration once things return to normal and would like to have more community events to help small businesses bounce back from a challenging time, they said, adding they are thankful for all the support received and look forward to seeing everyone back in the taproom soon.

By Sally Grace Holtgrieve

Sally Grace Holtgrieve solidified her passion for news during her time as Editor-in-Chief of Christopher Newport University's student newspaper, The Captain's Log. She started her professional career at The Virginia Gazette and moved to Texas in 2015 to cover government and politics at The Temple Daily Telegram. She started working at Community Impact Newspaper in February 2018 as the Lake Travis-Westlake reporter and moved into the role of Georgetown editor in June 2019.


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