City to work with Capital Metro on financing new Broadmoor and McKalla Place rail stations as development boom looms

The Broadmoor Campus is proposed to have a new MetroRail station. (Rendering courtesy Brandywine Realty Trust)
The Broadmoor Campus is proposed to have a new MetroRail station. (Rendering courtesy Brandywine Realty Trust)

The Broadmoor Campus is proposed to have a new MetroRail station. (Rendering courtesy Brandywine Realty Trust)

Image description
The city of Austin will work with Capital Metro to look into public financing options to help fund new MetroRail stations at the new Austin FC soccer stadium at McKalla Place and at the Broadmoor Campus in North Austin. (Amy Denney/Community Impact Newspaper)
The city of Austin expects the areas around the Broadmoor Campus and McKalla Place—the site of the new Austin FC stadium—to be primed for dramatic increases in development and subsequently heightened demand for transportation.

City Council acknowledged that looming boom Nov. 14 when it directed City Manager Spencer Cronk to work with the city’s public transportation authority, Capital Metro, to help finance the completion of new rail stations in the two areas.

Last year, City Council greenlit the first phase of a massive, 20-year, phased mixed-use development at the 66-acre Broadmoor Campus, an area currently occupied by the IBM campus. Plans for the area include at least 2,000 housing units and buildings reaching 360 feet tall. The area has been referred to as Austin's future second downtown. The developers agreed to help relocate the Kramer Lane MetroRail station to the Broadmoor Campus.

McKalla Place will also see some changes—construction is currently underway for the Austin FC stadium, Austin’s first professional sports complex. The birth of the stadium is expected to spur surrounding development. The aforementioned Kramer Lane MetroRail station was about a half-mile away from the stadium, but with its relocation to Broadmoor, Austin FC agreed to pay $3 million toward the construction of a new rail station.

However, more money is needed to develop the rail stations, and City Council asked Cronk on Nov. 14 to work with the transit authority in figuring out how to finance the construction. The direction, brought by District 7 Council Member Leslie Pool, floated the idea of a tax-increment reinvestment zone, which captures property tax increases in a specific area to fund targeted projects.


Although they supported the direction, some City Council members said they were uncomfortable with the creation of the tax-increment reinvestment zone because it prematurely earmarks property tax revenue that would otherwise go into the city’s general fund budget. Mayor Pro Tem Delia Garza said the city needs to be careful when wielding the tax-increment tool and using it too freely lead developers to think certain projects can just be paid for through tax-increment financing.

District 10 Alison Alter echoed Garza’s concerns.

“I think we have to be really careful earmarking our funds without understanding the down the line costs,” Alter said. “If we don't take in that tax money for our general fund, our general fund will be missing money that it needs to cover expenses, and we know that we're going to be struggling to get enough general fund money with the [state-mandated] revenue caps moving forward.”

Cronk is scheduled to come back with his findings by January 2020.
By Christopher Neely
Christopher Neely is Community Impact's Austin City Hall reporter. A New Jersey native, Christopher moved to Austin in 2016 following two years of community reporting along the Jersey Shore. His bylines have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Baltimore Su


MOST RECENT

Travis County is approaching Stage 5 risk with 69 new hospitalizations July 6. (Community Impact staff)
Travis County reports 7 new coronavirus deaths July 6

Travis County is appoaching Stage 5 risk with 69 new hospitalizations July 6 and 64.6 per day this past week.

A photo of two women walking on a trail
Travis County reopens some parks after holiday weekend, warns more closures could come

Seventeen Travis County parks will reopen following Fourth of July weekend closures.

Austin Community College President and CEO Richard Rhodes
Austin Community College resumes some in-person classes July 6

The district is continuing to offer most classes online, but some classes have resumed in-person activities.

Pharmacist Emily Smith opens a cooler for a patient to place their self-swab coronavirus test at a Walmart drive-thru testing site in McKinney on June 29. (Shelby Tauber/The Texas Tribune)
Poll says Texans' hopes for quick return to pre-coronavirus life are fading

Texans remain focused on the coronavirus pandemic and are less optimistic about returning the state to normal quickly, according to polling by the Texas Politics Project at the University of Texas.

Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller recently backed a movement calling for the reopening of winery and distillery tasting rooms and brewery and brewpub taprooms. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Texas Agriculture Commissioner joins voices calling for reopening of tasting rooms, taprooms

In a letter to Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller said demand from distilleries and breweries provides an important revenue stream to the state's farmers.

Rodney Redes
With its first signing, Austin FC looks to develop a young forward

With the beginning of its inaugural season less than a year out, professional soccer club Austin FC has officially begun building its roster.

Volunteers help load food at an event hosted by the Central Texas Food Bank at Del Valle High School in April. (Courtesy Central Texas Food Bank)
Central Texas Food bank announces four drives in July

Families in need can pick up free produce, milk, protein and shelf-stable items, as available, on four dates.

Travis County added 670 new coronavirus cases July 4-5.
Austin metro COVID-19 hospitalizations rise to 446 after holiday weekend

Travis County added 670 new coronavirus cases July 4-5.

Overall in Travis County there has been a total of 10,695 cases since mid-March.. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)
Travis County adds 571 COVID-19 cases; new restriction put in place ahead of holiday weekend

Overall in Travis County there has been a total of 10,695 cases since mid-March.

The First Street Foundation's dataset includes a forecast models that anticipate the effects of climate change and sea level rise. (Screenshot via First Street Foundation)
Analysis: FEMA may be undercounting national total flood risk by as much as 70%

The new dataset includes an interactive Flood Factor dashboard that anyone can use to assess the risk of flooding over a 30-year period for any address.

A photo of a person wearing a medical mask
Travis County Judge supports state masking order, says county will enforce

After Gov. Greg Abbot's statewise mandate to wear masks that cover mouth and nose, Travis County Judge Sam Biscoe voiced his support.