Update: Austin Community College to close at 10 a.m. March 13, extends spring break by 1 week

Austin Community College joined other area colleges by extending spring break for an additional week. (Courtesy Austin Community College)
Austin Community College joined other area colleges by extending spring break for an additional week. (Courtesy Austin Community College)

Austin Community College joined other area colleges by extending spring break for an additional week. (Courtesy Austin Community College)

Updated: March 13, 8:49 a.m.

Austin Community College announced it will be closing its schools and district offices beginning at 10 a.m. Friday, March 13.

"At this time, campus operations are expected to resume after the spring break on March 23 to prepare for working, teaching, and learning in an online environment," a news release from the district stated. "Instruction will resume Monday, March 30, in online and hybrid formats. Face-to-face instruction and services will be limited."

The college district has also "canceled all events and college-related travel," according to the release.

Original post: March 12, 4:26 p.m


Austin Community College extended its spring break, which originally was planned for March 16-20, for an additional week.

The announcement comes one day after the University of Texas also extended its spring break by one week.

“Employees return to offices as scheduled on March 23 to finalize preparations to transition to a virtual environment,” per a March 12 statement from the school. “Classes resume Monday, March 30, in online and hybrid formats. Face-to-face instruction and services will be limited.”

ACC joins a string of colleges and universities preparing to move to online courses amid concerns about the spread of coronavirus. UT President Greg Fenves said early March 12 that the school would be moving large classes, those with hundreds of students, to online only, while adapting others, like labs, that must continue to meet in person.

“While area health officials assure us that the risk remains low at this time, we expect cases in Texas will likely increase. Our best chance of minimizing the risk to our community and slowing the spread [of the virus] is to make these changes in advance of any cases turning up in our region,” ACC President and CEO Richard Rhodes said in the statement. “Our primary concern is the health and safety of our students, faculty, and staff. The college will continue to monitor the ever-changing situation and work closely with regional health agencies, governments and education partners.”

Information about how specific courses are affected will be available by March 25.

ACC also canceled all events and travel indefinitely.