Travis County, Austin Public Health report uptick in COVID-19 vaccine demand

A child gets a COVID-19 shot in November, shortly after the Food and Drug Administration authorized use of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 5 through 11. (Courtesy Dell Children’s Medical Center)
A child gets a COVID-19 shot in November, shortly after the Food and Drug Administration authorized use of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 5 through 11. (Courtesy Dell Children’s Medical Center)

A child gets a COVID-19 shot in November, shortly after the Food and Drug Administration authorized use of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 5 through 11. (Courtesy Dell Children’s Medical Center)

In the week following Thanksgiving, Travis County and Austin Public Health officials reported an uptick in demand for COVID-19 vaccines, largely driven by booster and pediatric shots.

The Travis County Vaccine Collaborative distributed 3,175 vaccine doses over the last seven days, a number that represents more than half of the shots administered throughout all of November, according to Travis County officials.

“While demand seemed to have subsided significantly over the past couple of weeks, it looks like people are once again seeking vaccinations,” said Charles Brotherton, Travis County executive for emergency services. “We’re doing lots of boosters; we’re doing lots of pediatric, so it was very encouraging.”

The 18,598 doses administered in Travis County during the week ending Dec. 4 was the second-highest weekly total since September, according to the Texas Department of State Health Services dashboard.

APH reported a similar increase in vaccines from the week ending Dec. 4 with 5,157 doses administered, 84% of which were boosters. According to a Dec. 7 press release, that figure was the highest since the week ending May 15.


The release noted the appearance of the omicron variant in the United States and Texas “reinforces health experts’ recommendation that everyone 18 and older get a booster shot to address declining immunity as potentially more contagious variants emerge.”

Travis County Constable George Morales III said the county offers vaccines that are available without an appointment.
By Benton Graham

Metro Reporter, Austin

Benton joined Community Impact Newspaper as a metro reporter covering transportation in Central Texas in June 2021. Benton's writing has appeared in Vox, The Austin Chronicle, Austonia and Reporting Texas. Originally from Minneapolis, Benton graduated from William & Mary and eventually moved to Austin in 2018.