4 things to know about daylight saving time ending this Sunday, Nov. 3

Daylight saving time ends Nov. 3, meaning clocks are turned back an hour that day.

Daylight saving time ends Nov. 3, meaning clocks are turned back an hour that day.

Daylight saving time ends early Sunday morning, Nov. 3, meaning clocks fall back an hour, giving Texas residents an extra hour of sleep.

Officially, daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. Nov. 3. To celebrate, clocks will be turned back an hour.

Where does the daylight saving practice come from?
Daylight saving time stems from the Uniform Time Act of 1966 that established a uniform daylight saving time throughout the U.S., according to the U.S. Department of Transportation, which oversees daylight saving time.

Daylight saving time is observed to save energy, increase traffic safety and reduce crime, according to the U.S. DOT:

  • By shifting the day ahead an hour, one hour of daylight is moved from the morning to the evening, during which time people are more likely to spend time outside and reduce energy consumption indoors.

  • During daylight time, a greater amount of travel occurs during the daylight, which means better visibility for drivers.

  • With daylight stretching longer into the evening, more people are able to conduct business and personal errands during the day rather than going out at night, during which time more crime occurs.


Who observes daylight saving time?
According to the U.S. DOT, states can choose to exempt themselves with a state law from observing daylight saving time. Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and most of Arizona have opted out of daylight saving time. However, if a state observes daylight saving time, the state must comply with federally mandated dates, such as when daylight saving time begins and ends.

According to a July 219 report on daylight saving time by the Congressional Research Service, 39 states have introduced legislation that would change the summer observance of daylight saving time, 29 states have introduced legislation proposing permanent daylight saving time, 26 states have introduced legislation to establish permanent standard time, and five states have introduced legislation to study the effects of daylight saving time.

Has Texas considered opting out of daylight saving time?
Yes. State Rep. Lyle Larson, R-San Antonio, introduced House Bill 3784 and House Joint Resolution 117 during the 86th legislative session this spring, which called for a statewide election in November allowing voters to indicate a preference for exempting Texas from daylight saving time or observing daylight saving time year-round, HB 3784 reads. Both pieces of legislation were passed by the House but did not make it to the Senate.

When will it begin again?
Daylight saving time will begin again March 8, 2020. Clocks will then spring ahead an hour.
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