Sienna Cryo offers pain management options to clients

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Sienna Cryo

When Meco Choates’s wife, Yolanda, decided to take on a more traditional exercise routine, the movements exacerbated some old injuries she received while serving in the U.S. Army.


Her trainer introduced her to cryotherapy, a treatment that exposes the body to extremely low temperatures for up to three minutes to help itself heal.


“She was the first one to try it and told me to try it; [she said] that it worked,” Meco Choates said.


Meco, who also served in the military, said he had herniated discs in his back and neck and was taking anti-inflammatory medicine every day to keep his pain managed. He said he wanted another option.


Cryotherapy temperatures get as low as minus 150 degrees Celsius, which causes the body to have a short-term tingling sensation, Meco Choates said.


“With cryotherapy, I feel like I found a solution to my pain,” he said. “It was also an alternative to the narcotics and anti-inflammatory medicines.”


Passionate about bringing cryotherapy options to their Missouri City neighbors, the Choateses opened Sienna Cryo in March 2018. A year later, the business has four employees and offers cryotherapy and other services, including those targeted toward young athletes to help them with performance.


Candace Daniels started bringing her daughter, Braelyn, to Sienna Cryo last year. The 11-year-old plays catcher on a softball team, and Candace said Braelyn’s knees and shoulders often hurt after practice.


A few times per week, Braelyn does cryotherapy as well as compression therapy, which uses air to massage limbs and speed recovery of muscles and joints.


“We have come here for a year, and it has really helped her knees and her shoulders,” Candace said.


Sienna Cryo also offers photobiomodulation—infrared light therapy—which Meco Choates said is an option for teens who have acne because the light kills bacteria. Light can also work to lighten scarring and help with other inflammatory diseases, such as psoriasis, he said.


All of the center’s services are meant to help the body awaken its own self-recovery mechanisms, Meco Choates said.


“It is an easy way to help the body heal and recover without invasive treatments,” he said. “I’ve seen it change people’s lives.”


 

Sienna Cryo
4340 Sienna Parkway, Ste. 106, Missouri City
281-915-5945
www.siennacryo.com
Hours: Mon.-Thu. 9 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri. 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

By Christine Hall
Christine Hall joined Community Impact Newspaper in October 2018, and covers Missouri City and Fort Bend ISD. She previously reported on health care innovation for the Texas Medical Center, was a freelancer, and held various news roles at the Houston Business Journal.


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