Conroe celebrates official music-friendly community designation

Musician Jason Allen plays at Pacific Yard House  on Dec. 18, where Conroe officials celebrated the city's music-friendly designation from the state.

Musician Jason Allen plays at Pacific Yard House on Dec. 18, where Conroe officials celebrated the city's music-friendly designation from the state.

Conroe became the first official music-friendly community in the Greater Houston area Dec. 18 in a celebration hosted at Pacific Yard House.

City officials and citizens mingled at the downtown music venue, listening to live music by local artists Kenna Danielle and Jason Allen.

"Folks around the world know the contributions Texas musicians have made over generations. We wanted to do more than honor the musical past; we wanted to make sure it has a future and make sure communities feel supported by our office, and make sure creators statewide have the support they need to create sustainable businesses and feel supported in their own community—and didn't feel like their first move in the music industry would be a literal move to somewhere else," Texas Music Office Director Brendon Anthony said. "Tonight Conroe has proved that they're in business with their [music] creators at home."

With the new official music-friendly designation, Conroe joins six other cities, including Austin, San Antonio and Fort Worth, which plan to join together in a spring roundtable discussion.

Anthony said the state of Texas puts 100,000 music industry professionals to work, contributing $323 million to the state's economy annually.

"I see so many people who have had something to do with music in Conroe over the years. Thank you all for your participation in going straight for what you wanted to do," Conroe Mayor Toby Powell said before reading the proclamation on stage at Pacific Yard House. "[The Visit Conroe team] has done so much to bring this to our attention. Anything y'all need us to do to support this event and support this program, we're here for you."

The program supports the collection and creation of a local database full of musicians, musical nonprofits, music education programs and venues in the area, making it available through a state website.

By Jules Rogers
Originally from the Pacific Northwest, Jules Rogers has been covering community journalism and urban trade news since 2014. She moved to Houston in June 2018 to become an editor with Community Impact Newspaper after four years of reporting for various newspapers affiliated with the Portland Tribune in Oregon, including two years at the Portland Business Tribune. Before that, Jules spent time reporting for the Grants Pass Daily Courier in Southern Oregon. Her favorite beats to cover are business, economic development and urban planning.