Conroe approves $181.8 million budget: 9 things to know from Conroe City Council, Aug. 24

Conroe City Council meets biweekly per month to discuss a variety of issues.

Conroe City Council meets biweekly per month to discuss a variety of issues.

Conroe City Council met Tuesday afternoon for its regular workshop meeting and again on Wednesday morning for its action agenda. Council members discussed a variety of topics, including the fiscal year 2017-18 budget and property tax rate.

  1. Conroe City Council approved a $181.8 million FY 2017-18 operating budget, a tax rate of 41.75 cents per $100 valuation for the 2017 tax year and a $53.5 million capital improvement program budget.

  2. On Wednesday, officials discussed the need for a full-service hotel and convention center in Conroe. Council members directed city staff to pursue a feasibility study regarding the potential facility.

  3. Council did not approve a variance in its tree ordinance to accommodate construction of a beauty salon near the intersection of 4th Street and Silverdale Drive. The variance died for lack of a motion.

  4. Council denied a request for a variance from a recently implemented ordinance that prevents construction of new hotels with less than 100 rooms. If the variance had been approved, it would allow for construction of a 48-room hotel on Hwy. 105 near Lake Conroe. The variance died for lack of a motion.

  5. City Council members approved the fiscal year 2017-18 garbage and recycling rates of $14.18 for residential units. The previous rate was set at $11.42. The rate goes into effect Oct. 1.

  6. City Council approved a 10 percent increase in its sewer rate for FY 2017-18, but voted to maintain its current water rate.

  7. Council approved an initiative to place a life-sized statue of Isaac Conroe in Founders Plaza.

  8. Council approved its annual payment of $85,000 to the Montgomery County Hospital District for dispatching services rendered for the Conroe Fire Department.

  9. Council members voted to consent to the creation of two out-of-city municipal utility districts. MUDs No. 157 and No. 158 would serve planned developments near Hwy. 242. The vote does not create the MUDs but allows initiatives to create the MUDs to move forward.



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