3 takeaways from Wednesday's Shenandoah City Council workshop

Topics discussed during the Shenandoah City Council regular workshop meeting June 14 included funding options for Water Plant No. 4.

Topics discussed during the Shenandoah City Council regular workshop meeting June 14 included funding options for Water Plant No. 4.

Increased water rate options, park regulations and the establishment of a proposed MetroPark Public Improvement District were among several hot-button issues discussed during Wednesday's regular Shenandoah City Council workshop meeting.

To view the full March 8 workshop agenda, visit www.shenandoahtx.us.

1. The council showed favor toward a $3 million expenditure for water projects at a 15-year debt schedule.
Shenandoah residents and business owners can expect a water rate increase, effective Oct. 1, to fund a third water plant and accommodate a rate increase from the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District.

Although no decision was made during Wednesday's discussion, the potential rate increase will be dependent upon if the council elects to go with a $2.5 million expenditure solely funding the third water plant or a $3 million expenditure funding a third water plant and repairing two loop lines. The rate will also depend on if the city chooses to follow a 15-year debt schedule or a 20-year debt schedule.

General consensus during the discussion was that council was in favor of the $3 million expenditure at a 15-year debt schedule, which would cover the third water plant construction and both loop line repairs. With this plan, a residential water bill for 3,000 gallons of water consumption would increase from $10.98 to $12.54 and from $22.12 to $25.76 for 7,000 gallons of water consumption.

However, since commercial water usage makes up roughly 65 percent of the city’s total water consumption, commercial rate options differed from residential rate options.

At the same $3 million expenditure on a 15-year debt schedule, the commercial bill for 50,000 gallons of water consumption would increase from $292.25 to $339.61 and from $1,060 to $1,267.86 for 100,000 gallons of water consumption.

Water rates will again be discussed at the council’s next regular meeting on March 22.

2. The Park Committee presented park reservation system and park guidelines.
Several months after residents brought park pavilion reservation and guideline concerns to the council, the Park Committee recommended a plan to the council.

According to the recommendation, pavilion reservations can be made for two-hour increments at a cost of $25 for residents and $35 for non-residents. One reservation can be made per address per month, and reservations do not guarantee the use of kitchens, fans, electricity or restrooms.

In the guidelines, the committee also prohibited organized team sports from playing or practicing in the park and defined organized team sports as any league or club—youth or adult—that congregates on a regular basis, pay to play in which participants pay a fee or dues to play, taking direction from anyone other than immediate family member, and any referee or official present.

The committee did not make a recommendation to council addressing safety concerns at the toddler park, residents previously brought to council’s attention.

3. A petition to create the MetroPark Public Improvement District was introduced.
The developer of MetroPark Square, Sam Moon Group, presented a petition to the council, which would create the MetroPark Public Improvement District and call for a public hearing on the project.

According to the council, the establishment of a Public Improvement District could potentially expedite the construction timeline for MetroPark Square and enhance the quality of construction, which in turn could bring in higher-end tenants to the mixed-use development.

Council unanimously accepted the petition and called for a future public hearing, approved Development Planning & Financing Group, Inc. as the PID consultant, and approved FMSBonds, Inc. as the underwriter for the proposed special assessment revenue bonds.
By Hannah Zedaker

Editor, Spring/Klein & Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood

Hannah joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in May 2016 after graduating with a degree in journalism from Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas. In March 2019, she transitioned to editor of the Spring/Klein edition and later became the editor of both the Spring/Klein and Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood editions in June 2021. Hannah covers education, local government, transportation, business, real estate development and nonprofits in these communities. Prior to CI, Hannah served as associate editor of The Houstonian, interned with Community Impact Newspaper and spent time writing for the Sam Houston State University College of Fine Arts and Mass Communication and The Huntsville Item.



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