Second Georgetown mosquito sample tests positive for West Nile Virus

Two more mosquitoes in Plano have tested positive for West Nile virus, prompting spraying in two south Plano neighborhoods.

Two more mosquitoes in Plano have tested positive for West Nile virus, prompting spraying in two south Plano neighborhoods.

Berry Creek mosquito mapA second mosquito sample in the Georgetown area tested positive for West Nile Virus this week.

The sample was collected in a trap in the Villages of Berry Creek neighborhood Oct. 18, according to a city news release today. The mosquito that tested positive was a Culex quinquefasciatus, also known as a southern house mosquito. The species has an approximate one-mile flight range.

There were 44 Culex mosquitoes in the sample; however, the number of mosquitoes with the West Nile Virus in the sample is not known, according to the news release.

The city is expected to spray a permethrin-based insecticide along the street and in public parks in the Villages of Berry Creek area, weather permitting, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday after 9 p.m. each night. Spraying will be done if the wind speed is less than 10 mph.

The insecticide will reduce the adult mosquito population, and the city will continue to use larvicide tablets to treat standing water on public property, according to the news release.

The city of Georgetown is a participant in the Williamson County and Cities Health District’s Integrated Mosquito Management Program.

The positive result was reported from the Texas Department of State Health Services lab in Austin, according to the news release.

There are no reported human cases of West Nile Virus in Williamson County, according to the news release.

The last reported case in the county was in 2014.

Residents can help reduce mosquito populations by eliminating mosquito-breeding areas and reduce the chance of mosquito bites.

WCCHD and TDSHS recommend residents:

  • Drain standing water in flowerpots, pet dishes or clogged gutters and treat water that cannot be drained

  • Use Environmental Protection Agency-approved insect repellent

  • Wear long sleeves and pants when outdoors

  • Use air conditioning or make sure there are screens on all doors and windows to keep mosquitoes out


For more information about West Nile Virus, visit www.txwestnile.org.