H-E-B at South Congress and Oltorf set to undergo two year-long renovation

H-E-B will renovate the store at 2400 S. Congress St. in South Central Austin, it longest-standing location in the city.

H-E-B will renovate the store at 2400 S. Congress St. in South Central Austin, it longest-standing location in the city.

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The longest-standing H-E-B in Austin will be undergoing a major renovation. The grocery store at 2400 S. Congress St. opened in 1957, and H-E-B will expand and renovate the location to offer additional services, according to a media release. Construction is set to begin next year, according to H-E-B, and the company expects renovations to finish in 2022.

The current store will stay open through the permitting and planning process, according to H-E-B, then when construction begins a temporary store will open at the Twin Oaks Shopping Center.

The current store is 69,000 square feet, and that space will expand to more than 100,000 square feet after the renovation. H-E-B said in the media release that new features will include a food hall with indoor and outdoor dining spaces, two levels of underground parking, and a beer garden.

In a statement, Leslie Sweet, H-E-B’s director of public affairs, said the company “spent years exploring options” for the store serving that growing neighborhood.

“We have a long, exciting road ahead of us, and our customers know we take the greatest care in planning and implementing any changes in our stores. This new store and its construction will be no exception,” Sweet said in the statement.512-442-2354 www.heb.com/southcongress


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