Texas Central high-speed rail project moves forward following RPA approval

The Federal Railway Administration granted a Rule of Particular Applicability to Texas Central Sept. 4.

The Federal Railway Administration granted a Rule of Particular Applicability to Texas Central Sept. 4.

The Federal Railway Administration granted the Rule of Particular Applicability—or RPA—to Texas Central on Sept. 4 regarding the high-speed rail project slated to connect Dallas and Houston, according to a Sept. 4 press release from Texas Central.

This means the high-speed rail project is on track for both FRA actions—the RPA and the environmental permit—to be completed in 2020 with financial close and construction quickly following, according to the release.

RPAs are regulations that apply to a specific railroad or a specific type of operation to ensure a project's safety, according to FRA information. This action, along with an environmental permit, is required before the project can be implemented.

“The FRA’s action on the Rule of Particular Applicability marks a major milestone in our quest to bring a transformative mobility solution, while minimizing impact on the environment and land use, as opposed to other options,” Texas Central CEO Carlos Aguilar said in the release. “We will meet or exceed all requirements the FRA mandates, to ensure we have the safest high-speed rail system in the world.”

The high-speed rail project will be based on Central Japan Railway's Tokaido Shinkansen technology, which is the world's safest mass transportation system, according to the release. It has transported more than 10 billion passengers with no operational passenger fatalities or accidents since its deployment in 1964, the release said.

“Securing [the U.S. Department of Transportation's] commitment to move forward with the Texas high-speed rail project is a significant win for all Texans, especially those who live in the 12th district, because it will create job opportunities, boost our economy, increase mobility and spur productivity in the lone star state," said U.S. Rep. Kay Granger, R-Fort Worth, in a separate Sept. 4 press release. "I’m pleased DOT recognized the importance of high speed rail, and am encouraged they will be moving forward with the regulatory process required to advance the project.”
By Kara McIntyre
Kara started with Community Impact Newspaper as the summer intern for the south Houston office in June 2018 after graduating with a bachelor's degree in mass communication from Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas. She became the reporter for north Houston's Tomball/Magnolia edition in September 2018, moving to Alpharetta in January 2020 after a promotion to be the editor of the Alpharetta/Milton edition, which is Community Impact's first market in Georgia.


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