A brief introduction to the history of Tomball, Magnolia

Visit the Magnolia Historic Depot Complex on Melton Street. (Anna Lotz/Community Impact Newspaper)
Visit the Magnolia Historic Depot Complex on Melton Street. (Anna Lotz/Community Impact Newspaper)

Visit the Magnolia Historic Depot Complex on Melton Street. (Anna Lotz/Community Impact Newspaper)

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Visit the Tomball Historic Depot Museum on South Elm Street. (Anna Lotz/Community Impact Newspaper)
Railroads and oil booms attracted settlers to the Tomball and Magnolia area at the turn of the 20th century. From Tomball’s incorporation in 1933, the city has grown from more than 600 residents to more than 11,600 residents in 2018. Similarly, the city of Magnolia has grown to include more than 2,200 residents in 2018, according to U.S. Census Bureau data. In just more than 100 years, Tomball and Magnolia have gone from receiving electricity to becoming quickly-growing suburban communities. According to Lessie Upchurch’s “Welcome to Tomball,” Tomball received its first electric lights in 1913 and its first power line in 1928. Magnolia, however, did not receive electricity until late 1940, according to “Magnolia Memories” by Celeste Graves.

Traveling through time


The Tomball and Magnolia area is home to several historical markers awarded by the Texas Historical Commission. Check out a few of them.

History on display


Tomball Historic Depot Museum

Find an O-scale model railroad inside the railroad caboose and a tiny Z-scale model railroad inside the historic train Depot as well as a collection of railroad artifacts, art and train memorabilia inside the Depot Museum.

201 S. Elm St., Tomball

281-351-5484

www.tomballtx.gov


Magnolia Historic Depot Complex

The depot area features several buildings important to Magnolia’s history, including the Magnolia Depot Museum, the doctor’s office and barbershop of the late Dr. James Ware, an antique sawmill and a railroad caboose.

426 Melton St., Magnolia

www.magnoliatxhistoricalsociety.com
By Anna Lotz

Anna joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in May 2016 after graduating with a degree in journalism from Cedarville University in Cedarville, Ohio. In July 2017, she transitioned to editor. Anna covers education, local government, transportation, business, real estate development and nonprofits in the Tomball and Magnolia communities. Prior to CI, Anna served as editor-in-chief of Cedars, interned with the National Journalism Center in Washington, D.C., and spent time writing for the Springfield News-Sun and Xenia Daily Gazette.


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