Q&A: Meet the Republican candidates running for Montgomery County Precinct 5 constable

Brian Clack (left) is running against incumbent Chris Jones for Precinct 5 constable in the March 3 Republican primary.
Brian Clack (left) is running against incumbent Chris Jones for Precinct 5 constable in the March 3 Republican primary.

Brian Clack (left) is running against incumbent Chris Jones for Precinct 5 constable in the March 3 Republican primary.

Brian Clack has filed to run against incumbent Chris Jones in the Republican primary for Montgomery County Precinct 5 constable. Q&A responses may have been edited for length.

*indicates incumbent

Brian Clack

Years lived in precinct:
36

If elected, I would change: the way the department works with other departments in the area to make our community the safest possible.


www.vote4clack.com

Why are you running for this position?

I believe that I am the most ethical candidate in this race. I believe the department needs to have a leader who will always do the right thing no matter what the cost. I have said it many times I am not a politician, I am a police officer. I want to do everything in my power to keep our community safe while protecting our officers at the same time.

What drew you to law enforcement?

Law Enforcement has been a life-long dream. I was raised in a Southern Baptist family who has always put others before ourselves. I love being there to help those in need. I believe that I have made an impact on our community due to my family values that [were] instilled in me and wish to continue [that impact] for years to come.

What is the biggest challenge in the area, and how do you plan to address it?

Our community has had a department turn their eye on the crime in our community that it became out of control. Narcotics are the biggest issue in our community. Narcotics affects all types of families from rich to poor. Dealers and users destroy our community causing safety issues. We work hard to have investments, and these users steal from our community not only personal items but from governmental programs as well. It is my promise to enforce the laws of our great government not only on the streets but in our schools.

How do you plan to keep Precinct 5’s crime rate low?

Officers have to be on the streets at all times as well as in our schools. Officers or deputies need to be diligent and enforce the laws. I believe that starting at a young age changing a child’s life in the right direction is our best effort. I believe that there needs to be drug K-9 units checking every school and parking lot each day. Quit hiding the fact that there is a problem and attack it. Once students realize that they can’t use our schools to sell or use drugs the schools will be safer.

If elected, what would be your goals as constable?

Officer safety and school safety. Officers need to be trained in all areas of law enforcement. Officers should be able to adapt and control any situation that they are confronted with. I will make sure that our officers are available to other agencies to assist when needed. I do not believe that this department has put enough effort into working together. My main goal is always to make sure I put my best effort into making our community safe.

Chris Jones*

Years lived in precinct: 45

If elected, I would change: As chief, I added active patrolling and investigations. ... We have increased narcotic and DWI arrests by 980%.

www.constablechrisjones.org

Why are you running for this position?

I have been working at the Precinct 5 Constable’s Department, serving in every role, since I graduated from the Police Academy. I love working for our community and specifically serving them in law enforcement. Under my leadership, we have experienced an increase in safety for Precinct 5. I want to continue the work I am doing in order to ensure our community continues to be a great place for everyone to live.

What drew you to law enforcement?

I’ve always had a strong desire to protect people and to do good by my community, while at the same time I’m approachable and someone that everyone can call a friend. I believe those who serve and defend our community should have those qualities. Law enforcement has been a great fit for my personality, and I’m very happy serving in this role.

What is the biggest challenge in the area, and how do you plan to address it?

The biggest concern will always be our growth. Montgomery County is one of the fastest growing counties in our nation. With that fast paced growth, communities can suffer from increased congestion, which can make emergency response sluggish. I think it’s important to address this by working with our Commissioners Court to ensure our roads are prepared to handle the growth so we are not stuck in traffic while enroute to help a victim.

How do you plan to keep Precinct 5’s crime rate low?

Our department works hard to have a very close relationship with our community. This makes us more aware of what is going on and where we can help. It also lets the community know that we are someone they know and can trust to call if they see something suspicious.

If elected, what would be your goals as constable?

My goals would include growing our department to meet population growth, continuing to work with our schools to ensure they are protected from any danger, and to continue to keep a close knit relationship with our community. We’ll also stay on top of the latest technologies and training in order to keep Precinct 5 safe.
By Kara McIntyre
Kara started with Community Impact Newspaper as the summer intern for the south Houston office in June 2018 after graduating with a bachelor's degree in mass communication from Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas. She became the Tomball/Magnolia reporter in September 2018. Prior to CI, Kara served as the editor-in-chief of The Wichitan—Midwestern State University's student-run campus newspaper—and interned with both the Wichita Adult Literacy Council and VeepWorks.


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