West Nile virus activity on rise in Montgomery County; spraying scheduled in August

Public health officials are cautioning residents of mosquito samples testing positive for West Nile virus in Montgomery County. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Public health officials are cautioning residents of mosquito samples testing positive for West Nile virus in Montgomery County. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Public health officials are cautioning residents of mosquito samples testing positive for West Nile virus in Montgomery County. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

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Montgomery County's South County Mosquito Abatement program has treated several areas of Precinct 3 and has additional treatment planned Aug. 18-20. (Screenshot via Montgomery County)
Montgomery County has seen 50 mosquito samples test positive for West Nile virus this year as of Aug. 10, compared to only two last year at the same time, Precinct 3 Commissioner James Noack announced in a release on Aug. 1.

As a result, the county mosquito abatement team has planned additional spray missions this month. A total of 33 zones tracked by the county have had positive sample test results for the virus, and 45 spray missions have been completed as of Aug. 17, according to the news release. County officials said the mosquitoes that transmit the virus are most active from dusk until dawn.


Within Precinct 3, which includes The Woodlands, activity is scheduled in mid-August. Treatment takes place between 8:30 p.m.-7 a.m. Progress can be tracked on the county’s treatment activity map.

The areas treated for mosquitoes are areas where disease activity is present, according to the county. For more information call the Precinct 3 Mosquito Abatement Department at 281-364-4203 or visit www.precinct3.org/mosquito-abatement.

County officials also offered the following advice for residents to control mosquito populations:

  • Wear insect spray.

  • Wear long, loose sleeves and pants in breathable fabrics.

  • Avoid being outdoors at dusk and dawn.

  • Drain areas with standing water.

  • Treat areas that cannot be drained with larvicide.



By Vanessa Holt
A resident of the Houston area since 2011, Vanessa began working in community journalism in her home state of New Jersey in 1996. She joined Community Impact Newspaper in 2016 as a reporter for the Spring/Klein edition and became editor of that paper in March 2017 and editor of The Woodlands edition in January 2019.