Child Advocates of Fort Bend saw 20% increase in case interviews in March 2020 versus March 2019

As the coronavirus pandemic persists throughout the world, one unfortunate side effect is that child abuse cases are on the rise. (Beth Marshall/Community Impact Newspaper)
As the coronavirus pandemic persists throughout the world, one unfortunate side effect is that child abuse cases are on the rise. (Beth Marshall/Community Impact Newspaper)

As the coronavirus pandemic persists throughout the world, one unfortunate side effect is that child abuse cases are on the rise. (Beth Marshall/Community Impact Newspaper)

As the coronavirus pandemic persists throughout the world, one unfortunate side effect is child abuse cases are on the rise.

Child Advocates of Fort Bend has seen a 20% increase in forensic interviews in March 2020, when social distancing mandates began, as compared March 2019, according to an April 27 press release from the nonprofit.

In early March, the agency hosted a grand opening at its expanded building in Rosenberg, which doubled its capacity to provide services to children. This expansion project was in response to a 53% increase in the last four years in the number children who have been abused or neglected and received services, according to the release.

“Fortunately for the children of Fort Bend County, we are better equipped to handle both the challenges of providing services digitally and the spike in the need for services than we were even a year ago,” CAFB CEO Ruthanne Mefford said in the release. “Our renovation included digital upgrades that have allowed our staff to more easily shift to working digitally, and we have both the space and the staff to meet the increased need."

As an essential services business, CAFB is remaining vigilant during the coronavirus outbreak. The agency has put measures into effect to continue providing services for children and families in the safest way possible, the release said. Forensic interviews are still being conducted on-site one at a time as a way to practice social distancing. Staff is also on call in the evenings and on weekends, and therapists have been conducting distance therapy sessions.


Although CAFB increased its capacity to serve, due to social distancing orders, the agency is currently unable to host several fundraising events, Mefford said.

"Much like [with] Hurricane Harvey, we expect that we will see a dramatic spike in reports once children return to school,” Mefford said in the release. “Because physical distancing mandates have forced us to cancel and reschedule several fundraising events, we are now facing both an increase in need and a shortage of funding.”

To help bridge this gap, CAFB is seeking additional funding from the community to continue providing service to children in need, the release stated. CAFB posted a challenge on Facebook to help raise $10,000 to fund their programs. To participate, go to their Facebook page or donate online at https://www.cafb.org/donate/.
By Beth Marshall
Born and raised in Montgomery County, Beth Marshall graduated from The University of Texas at San Antonio in 2015 with a bachelor's degree in communication and a minor in business. Originally hired as a reporter for The Woodlands edition in 2016, she became editor of the Sugar Land/Missouri City edition in October 2017.