Missouri City police first Texas police agency to adopt livestream 911 call technology

The Missouri City Police Department is the first Texas police agency to adopt technology allowing 911 calls to be livestreamed directly to officers in the field. (Courtesy Pexels)
The Missouri City Police Department is the first Texas police agency to adopt technology allowing 911 calls to be livestreamed directly to officers in the field. (Courtesy Pexels)

The Missouri City Police Department is the first Texas police agency to adopt technology allowing 911 calls to be livestreamed directly to officers in the field. (Courtesy Pexels)

The Missouri City Police Department has begun livestreaming 911 emergency calls directly to officers in the field, in real-time, marking the first Texas police agency to adopt the technology, according to a news release from the city of Missouri City on March 31.

The new technology, called Live911, allows officers to hear the caller’s actual words and voice, and is designed to provide a sense of urgency, details that might not be shared otherwise and immediate updates on the situation, according to the news release.


Live911 is designed to close the time gap between when 911 calls are received to when officers on patrol are dispatched by allowing officers to hear incoming 911 emergency calls in their geographical area, according to the release. The technology allows the officer to obtain more information for devising the appropriate response plan—including the use of de-escalation skills.

HigherGround, Inc., a Canoga Park, California-based software provider, developed the technology.

“We’re always looking for ways to improve services for our citizens and to improve officer safety,” said Brandon Harris, Missouri City Police Department captain in the news release. “With Live911, we can do both, because HigherGround developed this software with lower response times and officer safety in mind.”
By Hunter Marrow
Hunter Marrow came to Community Impact Newspaper in January 2020. Before that, Hunter covered local news in Ontario, OR for three years, covering municipal issues, crime, and education across Malheur County and across the border into Idaho.