Historically low unemployment may help Sugar Land job seekers

In June, Texas' unemployment rate hit a historic low.

In June, Texas' unemployment rate hit a historic low.

Texas' low unemployment rate serves Sugar Land-area job seekers well, according to John Romanow, vice president market leader for the South Central U.S. region at workforce solutions company Kelly Services.

In June, the unemployment rate fell to 3.4%—the lowest rate since the Texas Workforce Commission began tracking unemployment in 1976, the TWC said in a press release. That compares to 3.7% in May.

Texas added 45,000 seasonally adjusted non-farm positions in June and 315,000 over the past year.

"A low unemployment rate drives wages up, and job seekers have more choices of where they can direct their career, be more geographically selective and look for a cultural fit," Romanow said. "Fort Bend County and Sugar Land is a very diverse employment landscape—there are a lot of options."

Romanow said the job market was good for residents who feel their careers are reaching the end and would like to change careers or jobs. Though the climate is good for job seekers, he cautions they need to be diligent, have a solid work history and not take advantage of employers.

Industries filling jobs in the Sugar Land area include manufacturing, logistics, petrochemicals, professional and technical. Meanwhile, industries such as construction and services have already done much of their hiring for the summer, he said.

"Sugar Land has a nice mix of corporate headquarters, research and financial," Romanow said. "A lot of people are moving there and into Houston because of the specific skills in our labor force that they are looking for. It is a good time to utilize the market, get the training they need and seed that stability in their career."
By Christine Hall
Christine Hall joined Community Impact Newspaper in October 2018, and covers Missouri City and Fort Bend ISD. She previously reported on health care innovation for the Texas Medical Center, was a freelancer, and held various news roles at the Houston Business Journal.


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