Sushi Monster offers authentic Japanese cuisine

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Customers who dine at Sushi Monster will find authentic Japanese food as well as a dining room fit for meeting a business colleague, eating with friends or viewing the chef at work.

Sammie Lin opened the restaurant within Missouri City’s Sienna Plantation master-planned community in 2017. Sushi Monster is the fourth Japanese restaurant Lin has been involved in, the rest of which are now past projects, she said. Since opening, the community has embraced Sushi Monster, Lin said.

“We have a spirit for sushi and making it better,” she said. “We decided to locate in Sienna because it has a large group of people, and they have been great neighbors.”

In honor of Sushi Monster’s location, the menu features the Sienna Roll with shrimp tempura, cheese and jalapenos topped with crab salad, tuna, salmon, avocado, eel sauce, spicy mayonnaise and tiny tobiko fish eggs.

The restaurant’s chef, chef Yama, has been making sushi for the past 20 years and has become a celebrity of sorts on the company’s Facebook page, getting to know customers and chronicling their experiences, Lin said.

In addition to sushi, the restaurant offers hibachi, Asian-fusion, tempura, teriyaki, noodle dishes and tataki, which is a cooking method where the meat or fish is seared briefly.

One of the restaurant’s signature dishes is the Monster Tuna Tataki—sliced, seasoned and seared tuna with ponzu garlic sauce providing a hint of heat.

Another customer favorite is the Rock A Monster, which can be made with chicken, filet mignon or shrimp, cooked with peppers and served on a bed of rice, tomatoes and jalapenos. 

Whatever dish customers choose, Lin said she wants them to leave full and happy.

“When a customer comes in, we want them to feel like they are receiving high-quality food and a unique customer experience,” Lin said.

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Christine Hall
Christine Hall joined Community Impact Newspaper in October 2018, and covers Missouri City and Fort Bend ISD. She previously reported on health care innovation for the Texas Medical Center, was a freelancer, and held various news roles at the Houston Business Journal.
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