Democratic candidates for U.S. District 2 discuss issues facing the area

Three Democrats are seeking the nomination to run for U.S. District 2. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Three Democrats are seeking the nomination to run for U.S. District 2. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Three Democrats are seeking the nomination to run for U.S. District 2. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

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Elisa Cardnell
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Sima Ladjevardian
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Travis Olsen
Three Democratic candidates are running in the primary for Texas' 2nd congressional district.

Elisa Cardnell

Years in district: 16

If elected, I would: work to end big money in politics and bring Congress back to the people.

www.elisacardnell.com


What are the most important issues facing residents in your district?

I am running for strong and safe schools, to fix our health care system, and to get corporate money out of politics. Our politics and politicians are beholden to corporate donors. I’m not taking a penny of corporate PAC [political action committee] money so I can instead fight for my constituents.

What are your district’s greatest economic needs, and how do you feel you can help to address them?

So many Houstonians in our district are getting left behind in our economy. They are working multiple jobs because we don’t have a living wage. I will fight for a living wage of at least $15/hr so that every worker can make ends meet.

Why do you believe you would be a good voice to represent Texans on the national level?

Texans are tough, but compassionate. We’re not afraid to speak up for what’s right. Right now [District 2] is represented by a congressman who cares more about pleasing [President Donald] Trump and his next TV interview. I will put Texas over Trump and fight for our local values.

What do you plan to do to relieve or prevent flooding disasters in the future?

Getting serious about flooding means holding contractors accountable for our federal money, holding developers accountable for new flood standards, getting serious about climate change, and making sure Houston gets the federal money we deserve.

Sima Ladjevardian

Years in district: 31

If elected, I would: believe people should have confidence that they have representation on the things that matter most to them.

www.simafortx.com

What are the most important issues facing residents in your district?

As a breast cancer survivor, I know that access to affordable health care and prescription drugs is important to every American whether they live in the Greater Houston area or not. American families should not have to choose between putting food on their table or paying for necessary medications.

What are your district’s greatest economic needs, and how do you feel you can help to address them?

Flood recovery/prevention and infrastructure are some of the greatest needs. We need to fight to streamline federal funds to support flood recovery and prevention—it is unacceptable that families are waiting for relief. We must invest in our infrastructure to prevent future catastrophes.

Why do you believe you would be a good voice to represent Texans on the national level?

We deserve leaders who have the political courage to stand up to the politics of fear and division and bring people together to solve the biggest problems facing Houston and our country. We’re at a critical moment in our country’s history, and we can’t stay silent.

What do you plan to do to relieve or prevent flooding disasters in the future?

We need leaders in Congress that will work with state and local leaders and invest in flood prevention to not only rebuild our communities that have been impacted by flooding, but also build them stronger and safer to protect them from future floods.

Travis Olsen

Years in district: 20

If elected, I would: bring civility, dignity and humanity to our government and put principles above politics.

https://olsen2020.com

What are the most important issues facing residents in your district?

An effective and efficient government is the most important need for all Americans. We need to move past political bickering and partisanship because polarization achieves nothing.

What are your district’s greatest economic needs, and how do you feel you can help to address them?

Flood control is key to supporting economic development. I will be an advocate for the second district in Washington in streamlining the process for assistance and infrastructure projects.

Why do you believe you would be a good voice to represent Texans on the national level?

As a former federal civil servant I understand the federal bureaucracy and can be an effective advocate for our district to federal agencies.

What do you plan to do to relieve or prevent flooding disasters in the future?

The entire Houston congressional delegation minus Dan Crenshaw, my representative, voted to simplify the emergency management process. That is why I’m running. We don’t want political games but to find real solutions to the real challenges we face.



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