Harris County Precinct 4, Champions MUD celebrate completion of Champions Drive ahead of 2020 U.S. Women's Open Golf Tournament

Harris County Precinct 4 and the Champions Municipal Utility District celebrated the completion of Champions Drive in a ribbon-cutting ceremony Nov. 19—just weeks before the 2020 U.S. Women's Open Golf Tournament is scheduled to take place in the area. (Courtesy Harris County Precinct 4)
Harris County Precinct 4 and the Champions Municipal Utility District celebrated the completion of Champions Drive in a ribbon-cutting ceremony Nov. 19—just weeks before the 2020 U.S. Women's Open Golf Tournament is scheduled to take place in the area. (Courtesy Harris County Precinct 4)

Harris County Precinct 4 and the Champions Municipal Utility District celebrated the completion of Champions Drive in a ribbon-cutting ceremony Nov. 19—just weeks before the 2020 U.S. Women's Open Golf Tournament is scheduled to take place in the area. (Courtesy Harris County Precinct 4)

Harris County Precinct 4 and the Champions Municipal Utility District celebrated the completion of Champions Drive in a ribbon-cutting ceremony Nov. 19—just weeks before the 2020 U.S. Women's Open Golf Tournament is scheduled to take place in the area.

In anticipation of increased traffic on the roadway for the 75th annual event, Harris County Precinct 4 and the Champions Municipal Utility District began construction in September 2018 on a $13.3 million joint project to upgrade Champions Drive from a two-lane asphalt road to a two-lane concrete paved section with improved drainage between FM 1960 and Cypress Creek.

While construction wrapped up in April, the event, which was originally scheduled to take place June 4-7 at Champions Golf Course and Cypress Creek Course, was postponed to Dec. 10-13 due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. While spectators are not allowed on-site due to the pandemic, fans are encouraged to watch online.

"Strong community partners like Champions MUD allow us to provide more with less," Precinct 4 Commissioner Jack Cagle said in a statement. "Residents can take great pride in knowing they have a roadway worthy of their community."

According to a Nov. 11 news release, because concrete is more durable, the upgraded lanes should require less maintenance and last longer than asphalt.


Additionally, the project features updated landscaping and a unique drainage system that could reduce flooding in the area. According to the release, the system includes 13,335 underground crates wrapped in permeable fabric that will allow water to seep into the ground quickly. Layers of gravel surrounding the crates serve as a cost-effective water filtration system and stabilizer that can convey about 2.5 million gallons of water during high-water situations.
By Hannah Zedaker

Editor, Spring/Klein & Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood

Hannah joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in May 2016 after graduating with a degree in journalism from Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas. In March 2019, she transitioned to editor of the Spring/Klein edition and later became the editor of both the Spring/Klein and Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood editions in June 2021. Hannah covers education, local government, transportation, business, real estate development and nonprofits in these communities. Prior to CI, Hannah served as associate editor of The Houstonian, interned with Community Impact Newspaper and spent time writing for the Sam Houston State University College of Fine Arts and Mass Communication and The Huntsville Item.