Harris County Flood Control District installs 23 new gauge stations throughout Greater Houston area

Ahead of the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season, which runs June 1-Nov. 30, the Harris County Flood Control District recently installed 23 new gauge stations throughout the Greater Houston area, which are expected to provide the district with enhanced rainfall information throughout the region in the event of future flooding. (Courtesy Harris County Flood Control District)
Ahead of the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season, which runs June 1-Nov. 30, the Harris County Flood Control District recently installed 23 new gauge stations throughout the Greater Houston area, which are expected to provide the district with enhanced rainfall information throughout the region in the event of future flooding. (Courtesy Harris County Flood Control District)

Ahead of the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season, which runs June 1-Nov. 30, the Harris County Flood Control District recently installed 23 new gauge stations throughout the Greater Houston area, which are expected to provide the district with enhanced rainfall information throughout the region in the event of future flooding. (Courtesy Harris County Flood Control District)

Ahead of the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season, which runs June 1-Nov. 30, the Harris County Flood Control District recently installed 23 new gauge stations throughout the Greater Houston area, which are expected to provide the district with enhanced rainfall information throughout the region in the event of future flooding.

According to an April 22 news release, the newly installed gauge stations include 10 located within the HCFCD's network and 13 located outside of the district's network as part of regional partnerships. These gauge stations were installed through interlocal agreements with Waller and Fort Bend counties, the city of Friendswood and Galveston County Drainage District No. 1.

The 10 new gauges installed within the district's network are located at the following intersections:

  • Boggy Bayou at San Augustine Street

  • Patricks Bayou at East Eighth Street

  • Taylor Bayou at Port Road

  • Clear Creek at Dixie Farm Road

  • East Fork San Jacinto at Hwy. 105

  • Tarkington Bayou at Hwy. 105

  • Luce Bayou at Hwy. 321

  • Armand Bayou at Space Center Boulevard

  • Cedar Bayou at FM 1960

  • Vince Bayou at Fairmont Parkway


According to the release, gauge stations installed along Cedar, Luce and Tarkington Bayous as well as the East Fork of the San Jacinto River were added to increase rainfall coverage and water level information on the upstream headwaters of watersheds in northern and central Liberty County, northeastern Montgomery County and eastern Harris County.

"It became clear during the widespread and significant flooding resulting from Tropical Storm Imelda in this area, that additional rainfall and stream information in the headwaters of these watersheds should greatly benefit downstream warning and preparations in northeast Harris County," the release said.

Similarly, the district installed gauge stations in southeast Harris County at the requests of the cities of Deer Park, Pasadena and El Lago to monitor rainfall and stream levels in areas that have historically experienced flooding during heavy rainfall, the release stated.


In addition to these 23 new gauge stations, the district is also planning to add new gauge stations in League City, Missouri City and 15 additional locations in 2021, the release stated.

"Since the flooding associated with Hurricane Harvey in 2017, a total of 102 new gage stations have been added to the regional flood warning system network," the release said. "The current regional flood warning system network has a total of 360 gage stations when combined with those locations operated and maintained by the San Jacinto River Authority, the Texas Department of Transportation and the Trinity River Authority, and is one of the largest and most sophisticated networks in the nation."
By Hannah Zedaker

Editor, Spring/Klein & Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood

Hannah joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in May 2016 after graduating with a degree in journalism from Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas. In March 2019, she transitioned to editor of the Spring/Klein edition and later became the editor of both the Spring/Klein and Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood editions in June 2021. Hannah covers education, local government, transportation, business, real estate development and nonprofits in these communities. Prior to CI, Hannah served as associate editor of The Houstonian, interned with Community Impact Newspaper and spent time writing for the Sam Houston State University College of Fine Arts and Mass Communication and The Huntsville Item.